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Last Updated : Apr 04, 2020 01:41 PM IST | Source: Moneycontrol.com

Coronavirus pandemic | Saudi Arabia man faces possible death sentence for spitting in public

The crime is grave, but especially so now as the kingdom battles the COVID-19 pandemic

A Saudi man walks past a poster depicting Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz, after a curfew was imposed to prevent the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Riyadh (REUTERS/Ahmed Yosri)
A Saudi man walks past a poster depicting Saudi King Salman bin Abdulaziz, after a curfew was imposed to prevent the spread of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), in Riyadh (REUTERS/Ahmed Yosri)

A man caught spitting at shopping trolleys in a mall in Saudi Arabia’s north-western region of Hail could face the death penalty for his actions, Gulf News reported.

The offender was arrested and authorities are conducting remote interrogation to determine his motive, a source within the prosecution told the publication. The crime is grave, but especially so now as the kingdom battles the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic.

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The source said that his act is “among the major crimes, religiously and legally condemned and can reach the death penalty”.

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“It is regarded as imparting corruption by deliberately seeking to spread COVID-19 among members of society and stirring panic among them," the source added.

Saudi Arabia has till April 4 registered 2.039 positive cases and 25 deaths, as per the Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Research Centre. Saudi King Salman ordered a curfew from 7 pm to 6 am for 21 days - to slow the spread of the coronavirus, state news agency SPA reported.

The nationwide curfew began from March 23 with cities of Riyadh, Mecca and Medina observing curfew from 3 pm onwards. As of March 27 movement in 13 regions had been banned.

The region has expanded measures to combat the spread of the disease. Kuwait and Saudi Arabia have taken some of the most drastic steps including halting international flights, suspending work at most institutions and closing public venues.

Follow our full COVID-19 coverage here
First Published on Apr 4, 2020 01:41 pm
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