Moneycontrol

Budget 2021

Associate Partners:

  • SMC
  • Samsung
  • Volvo

Moneycontrol

Budget 2021

Associate Partners:

  • SMCSamsungVolvo
Webinar :Join an expert panel for a webinar on Smart investments for a secure retirement January 28, 2021. Register now!
you are here: HomeNewsTrends

COVID-19 impact: Without a salary since March, this Delhi mathematics teacher now sells bags to make ends meet

Mohammad Faizi, teaches mathematics to students of classes 6 to 8 at a private school and has been conducting online classes but without any salary since the lockdown started.

August 26, 2020 / 07:31 PM IST
Representative Image (Image: Moneycontrol)

Representative Image (Image: Moneycontrol)


A mathematics teacher in Delhi who alleges he hasn't received a salary since March, has now taken to selling cloth bags at a weekly market in Delhi's Dilshad Garden to make ends meet.

According to a report by PTI, Mohammad Faizi, teaches mathematics to students of classes 6 to 8 at a private school and has been conducting online classes but without any salary since the lockdown started.

A resident of Shahdara, the 30-year-old teacher told PTI that he is unable to pay the school fees for his two daughters. Faizi lives in a two-room house with his elderly parents, wife, and two daughters, aged five and 10.

"My friends have helped me financially, but I cannot ask them for more," Faizi said. "We have been managing somehow. I could not pay the school fee of my daughters, so I am teaching them myself now."

Faizi, who took online classes during the day, reached a weekly market in Dilshad Garden on August 25 evening to sell cloth bags made by one of his friends.

Close

COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

View more
How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

View more
Show

"My friends manufacture these bags. He suggested I could sell them in the market and keep the profits," he says, waiting for customers.

Weekly markets in the national capital, which remained shut since March-end due to the coronavirus lockdown, reopened on August 24 after the Delhi government allowed it till August 30 on a trial basis.

Faizi says he can understand why the school would not be able to pay his salary for some time.

"Many families have been rendered jobless due to COVID. Many people like me are unable to pay their children's school fee. So the schools, too, are finding it difficult to pay their teachers," he says.

Faizi underscores that he wants to continue teaching his students,
"I want to teach during the day and do something else in the evening to make ends meet. That's why the weekly market seemed a better idea," he says.

On his first day, Faizi could not sell anything as the police asked vendors to vacate the space after it became overcrowded.

"The coronavirus pandemic has affected millions of lives, I'm one among them," Faizi says. "I just hope that my family remains safe. I cannot afford medical expenses."
--With inputs from PTI
Moneycontrol News
first published: Aug 26, 2020 07:31 pm

stay updated

Get Daily News on your Browser
Sections