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Virat Kohli, Ishant Sharma get first dose of vaccination

India vice-captain Ajinkya Rahane, pacer Umesh Yadav and Senior opener Shikhar Dhawan have already got their first dose of vaccination.

May 10, 2021 / 02:38 PM IST
Source: Instagram/virat.kohli

Source: Instagram/virat.kohli


India captain Virat Kohli and senior pacer Ishant Sharma on Monday received their first dose of COVID-19 vaccination.

While Kohli, who now lives in Mumbai, posted a photo on instagram, Ishant and his wife Pratima, a former India hoopster, also uploaded their selfie infront of a vaccination centre.

"Thankful for this and grateful for all the essential workers. Happy to see the smooth running of the facility & management. Let's all get vaccinated at the earliest," Ishant wrote on his twitter handle.

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COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

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How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

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India vice-captain Ajinkya Rahane, pacer Umesh Yadav and Senior opener Shikhar Dhawan have already got their first dose of vaccination.

Follow our LIVE blog for latest updates of the novel coronavirus pandemic

The Indian team will be leaving for England on June 2 for a three and a half month tour, comprising of six Test matches including the World Test Championship final against New Zealand.

In order to ramp up the coronavirus vaccination drive in the country, the Centre had last month announced a 'liberalised and accelerated' Phase 3 strategy of COVID-19 vaccination from May 1.

Now, everyone above the age of 18 are eligible to get COVID-19 vaccine.

Follow our full coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here.
PTI
first published: May 10, 2021 02:30 pm

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