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Opto Circuits says it received global orders to supply pulse oximeters, digital thermometers

The company said it has USFDA approvals, patents and technology for manufacturing of these products.

July 29, 2020 / 02:36 PM IST
 
 
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Opto Circuits, medical device maker said it had received orders for supply of pulse oximeters and thermometers from global customers, as the demand for these products have increased substantially due to COVID-19.


The Bengaluru-based company has started manufacturing of pulse oximeter, multi para monitor systems and digital thermometers for domestic and global markets.

The company didn't specify the size of these orders.


The company said it has USFDA approvals, patents and technology for manufacturing of these products.


The demand for these products has increased significantly in India and all over the world due to COVID-19 pandemic situation.

The company said it has been selling various types of pulse oximeters across the world over the last 12 years, under the brand names of Mediaid and Criticare.


The different types of pulse oximeters include finger pulse oximeter, bedside or lCU pulse oximeters, multi para meter and patient monitoring systems.

Digital thermometers have been marketed under the brand names of Faichney, Mediaid and Life Aid by the company for sale all over the world. Over the past few years, Opto Circuits has sold several millions of thermometers in USA, Far East, Middle East and lndia.


The company had acquired the digital thermometers division from Hindustan Lever in 2002, while the Pulse Oximeter range of products came through the acquisition of two companies in USA.


“The demand for the company's products has gone up substantially in the recent months due to increase in demand for our products in India and globally,"  said Vinod Ramnani, Director of Opto Circuits.


"Overall, we are very confident on the business turnaround led by the upcoming favourable period in terms of demand and cost efficiency measures,” the company added.

Opto Circuits, which was largest medical device manufacturer at one point of time, has been struggling with high debt and cash flow issues.

Please read here on how the company is trying to make a comeback.

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Viswanath Pilla is a business journalist with 14 years of reporting experience. Based in Mumbai, Pilla covers pharma, healthcare and infrastructure sectors for Moneycontrol.
first published: Jul 29, 2020 02:36 pm

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