172@29@17@107!~!172@29@0@53!~!|news|india|coronavirus-vaccine-update-mumbais-kem-hospital-starts-trials-of-covishield-vaccine-5875301.html!~!news|moneycontrol|com!~!|controller|infinite_scroll_article.php!~!is_mobile=false
Moneycontrol
FREE virtual training session on Passive Income Secrets: October 24 and 25, 2020, 10am to 1pm. Register Now!
you are here: HomeNewsIndia
Last Updated : Sep 23, 2020 02:32 PM IST | Source: PTI

Coronavirus vaccine update | Mumbai's KEM Hospital starts trials of Covishield vaccine

The hospital, located in Parel area, on Tuesday got the approval of the Maharashtra ethics committee for conducting the vaccine trials.

PTI

The civic-run King Edward Memorial (KEM) Hospital in Mumbai on Wednesday began phase II and III trials of the Oxford Covishield vaccine for COVID-19, an official said.

The hospital, located in Parel area, on Tuesday got the approval of the Maharashtra ethics committee for conducting the vaccine trials.

KEM Hospital Dean Dr Hemant Deshmukh told PTI that the hospital has started screening volunteers for the trials.

Close

The medical facility will be conducting the trials on 100 volunteers, he said.

COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

View more
How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

View more
Show

Follow our LIVE blog for the latest updates of the novel coronavirus pandemic

The city-based B Y L Nair Hospital, another facility run by the Brihanmumbai Municipal Corporation (BMC), has also received approval for conducting trials of the vaccine.

Both the KEM and Nair hospitals will be conducting the trials collectively on over 200 volunteers, sources said.

As part of the trials, volunteers who are found negative for coronavirus in both RT-PCR and antigen tests will be given the vaccine, they said.

Trials of the Oxford vaccine candidate are being conducted in Pune also.

The Pune-based Serum Institute of India (SII) has partnered with British-Swedish pharma company AstraZeneca for manufacturing the COVID-19 vaccine candidate, being developed by the University of Oxford, UK.

Follow our full coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here.

 
First Published on Sep 23, 2020 02:32 pm
Sections