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Last Updated : Oct 16, 2020 10:26 PM IST | Source: Moneycontrol.com

Coronavirus India | Delhi overtakes Pune to emerge as city worst hit by COVID-19

In Delhi, where the number of fresh coronavirus cases had declined considerably in June and July, new COVID-19 cases began rising sharply for some time in September. The daily case load declined a little again, only to start galloping after a gap of about two weeks

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Delhi is once again the Indian city worst-hit by the novel coronavirus outbreak. The national capital, which reported over 3,000 new COVID-19 infections on October 15, has a total tally of 3.21 lakh at present.

Delhi has now overtaken Pune as the city with the maximum number of coronavirus cases. For the past one-and-a-half month till October 15, Pune had carried the maximum burden of COVID-19 infected persons.

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Pune had reported over 5,000 cases per day a few times in August and September, but the numbers had been declining steadily for the past month. This week, Pune reported less than 1,500 cases daily.

In Delhi, the number of fresh coronavirus cases had declined considerably in June and July, but has begun to rise sharply for some time in September. The daily case load declined a little again, only to start galloping after a gap of about two weeks.

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One of the other cities worst affected by coronavirus pandemic is Bengaluru. Fresh cases have been rising in thousands and the total COVID-19 tally is already hovering around the three-lakh mark.

COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

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How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

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Bengaluru had reported nearly 3,800 cases and over 4,500 on October 15 and October 14, respectively. If the increase in fresh COVID-19 cases continues at this rate, Bengaluru may soon overtake Pune and Delhi as the worst-hit city.

Meanwhile, Maharashtra’s capital Mumbai, which had struggled to bring down the number of COVID-19 infections at one point, recorded around 2,000 cases on October 15. The city’s coronavirus tally right now is 2.36 lakh.

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First Published on Oct 16, 2020 10:23 pm
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