Moneycontrol

Budget 2021

Associate Partners:

  • SMC
  • Samsung
  • Volvo

Moneycontrol

Budget 2021

Associate Partners:

  • SMCSamsungVolvo
Webinar :Join an expert panel for a webinar on Smart investments for a secure retirement January 28, 2021. Register now!
you are here: HomeNewsBusiness

Banks’ financials may face pressure from higher NPAs and muted income growth, says RBI report

With the loan moratorium coming to an end, the deadline for restructuring proposals is fast approaching and with the possible lifting of the asset quality standstill, banks’ financials are likely to be impacted in terms of asset quality and future income.

December 29, 2020 / 06:12 PM IST

The Reserve Bank of India (RBI) on December 29 said banks’ financials may likely come under pressure as COVID-19- related relaxations are withdrawn slowly and asset quality pressure becomes evident.

With the moratorium coming to an end, the deadline for restructuring proposals is fast approaching and with the possible lifting of the asset quality standstill, banks’ financials are likely to be impacted in terms of asset quality and future income, the RBI said in its Trend and Progress report.

In anticipation of higher loan delinquencies, banks have announced ambitious plans to shore up their capital bases to adhere to regulatory requirements and to be lending-ready as and when credit demand bounces back, the report said.

“Going forward, banks will have to adapt and adjust to the rapidly evolving economic landscape due to these challenges and also the entry of niche players and emerging financial technologies,” the RBI said.

In the wake of COVID-19, the RBI announced a six-month moratorium on all term loans for banks and followed it up with a one-time loan restructuring plan. The government put all fresh bankruptcy cases on hold till March, 2021, while the Supreme Court in an interim order asked banks not to tag any loan as NPA that were on standard as on August 31.

Close

COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

View more
How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

View more
Show

Although, banks’ financial conditions improved on lower slippages and higher capital buffers and provisions, subdued economic conditions amplified risk aversion and dragged down credit off-take, the RBI report said.

During FY21 so far, the safe haven appeal of banks led to a sharp accretion to deposits, the report said.

“With credit demand remaining anaemic, as the deleterious effects of COVID-19 played out on the economy, banks preferred to park funds in safer G-Secs to partially offset the impact of low lending,” the report said.

Banks have been parking an average of Rs 6 lakh crore in the RBI’s reverse repo window almost every day due to falling loan demand and excess liquidity in the banking system.
Moneycontrol News

stay updated

Get Daily News on your Browser
Sections