you are here: HomeNewsPhotosWorld

Women's Day 2021 | How the COVID-19 pandemic has affected women around the world

From childbirth in isolation to juggling work, parenting and remote learning from home, here are some of the ways the coronavirus has changed women's lives.

March 08, 2021 / 08:42 PM IST
Maxine Sharples, 36, a paramedic for North West NHS Ambulance service, poses for a portrait at The Royal Blackburn Teaching Hospital in north west England, Britain, March 3, 2021. "As soon as I get home I shut the door and I’m back to being a mum and a wife, and I just have to play that role until I go back to work again," Sharples said. (Image: Reuters)
Maxine Sharples, 36, a paramedic for North West NHS Ambulance service, poses for a portrait at The Royal Blackburn Teaching Hospital in northwest England, Britain, on March 3, 2021. "As soon as I get home I shut the door and I’m back to being a mum and a wife, and I just have to play that role until I go back to work again," Sharples said. (Image: Reuters)
Bianca Toniolo, 3, smiles as she has a video call with her mother Chiara Zuddas, 32, who is self-isolating in a bedroom after having contact with someone with coronavirus, in this picture taken by Bianca's father who is also in quarantine at home with his family in San Fiorano, Italy, February 9, 2021. (Image: Reuters)
Bianca Toniolo, 3, smiles as she has a video call with her mother Chiara Zuddas, 32, who is self-isolating in a bedroom after having contact with someone with coronavirus, in this picture taken by Bianca's father who is also in quarantine at home with his family in San Fiorano, Italy, on February 9, 2021. (Image: Reuters)
Secondary school student Jackline Bosibori, 17, who is nine months pregnant, sits outside her home with her family's hen in Lindi village within the Kibera slums in Nairobi, Kenya, November 4, 2020. Many Kenyan advocacy groups fear adolescent pregnancies increased as girls were forced to stay home while parents still went to work. "If I was in school, I could have not been pregnant," she said. For Bosibori, school closures have made her dream of becoming a lawyer seem far away. "I feel I have not progressed in any way this year," laments Bosibori. "If I was in school, I could have improved in my goals." (Image: Reuters)
Secondary school student Jackline Bosibori, 17, who is nine months pregnant, sits outside her home with her family's hen in Lindi village within the Kibera slums in Nairobi, Kenya, on November 4, 2020. Many Kenyan advocacy groups fear adolescent pregnancies increased as girls were forced to stay home while parents still went to work. "If I was in school, I could have not been pregnant," she said. For Bosibori, school closures have made her dream of becoming a lawyer seem far away. "I feel I have not progressed in any way this year," laments Bosibori. "If I was in school, I could have improved in my goals." (Image: Reuters)
A woman works from home with her child in Sassenheim, Netherlands October 2, 2020. (Image: Reuters)
A woman works from home with her child in Sassenheim, the Netherlands on October 2, 2020. (Image: Reuters)
Mayu adjusts Koiku's kimono as Koiku poses for a photograph, before they work at a party and entertain with other geisha at Asada, a luxury restaurant in Tokyo, Japan, June 23, 2020. Tokyo's geisha - famed for their witty conversation, beauty and skill at traditional arts - were without work for months due to Japan's state of emergency and now operate under awkward social distancing rules. (Image: Reuters)
Mayu adjusts Koiku's kimono as Koiku poses for a photograph before they work at a party and entertain with other geisha at Asada, a luxury restaurant in Tokyo, Japan, on June 23, 2020. Tokyo's geisha - famed for their witty conversation, beauty and skill at traditional arts - were without work for months due to Japan's state of emergency and now operate under awkward social distancing rules. (Image: Reuters)
Traveling nurse Meghan Lindsey, who returned home after working five weeks at NYU Winthrop Hospital during the outbreak, lays in bed with her daughters Braelyn and Avery watching television at their home in Neosho, Missouri, May 16, 2020. Meghan's work gave her the chance to strike out into the world, confront danger and make a difference, while her husband stayed home to care for their daughters. (Image: Reuters)
Travelling nurse Meghan Lindsey, who returned home after working five weeks at NYU Winthrop Hospital during the outbreak, lies in bed with her daughters Braelyn and Avery watching television at their home in Neosho, Missouri, on May 16, 2020. Meghan's work gave her the chance to strike out into the world, confront danger and make a difference, while her husband stayed home to care for their daughters. (Image: Reuters)
Neonatal nurse Kirsty Hartley carries premature baby Theo Anderson to his mother Kirsty Anderson in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the Lancashire Women and Newborn Centre at Burnley General Hospital in East Lancashire, in Burnley, Britain May 15, 2020. (Image: Reuters)
Neonatal nurse Kirsty Hartley carries premature baby Theo Anderson to his mother Kirsty Anderson in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit at the Lancashire Women and Newborn Centre at Burnley General Hospital in East Lancashire, in Burnley, Britain, on May 15, 2020. (Image: Reuters)
Felix Hassebroek pretends to be a fireman, interrupting his mother Naomi as she works from home during in Brooklyn, New York, May 6, 2020. (Image: Reuters)
Felix Hassebroek pretends to be a fireman, interrupting his mother Naomi as she works from home in Brooklyn, New York, on May 6, 2020. (Image: Reuters)
Vanderlecia Ortega dos Santos, 32, a nurse from the Witoto tribe who has volunteered to provide the only frontline care protecting her indigenous community of 700 families from the COVID-19 outbreak, wears a face mask that reads "Indigenous lives matter" as she puts on PPE before leaving her home in Parque das Trios, Taruma district, Manaus, Brazil, April 26, 2020. "Our people are dying from this disease here and they are not being recognized as indigenous people by the state and Sesai," she said. (Image: Reuters)
Vanderlecia Ortega dos Santos, 32, a nurse from the Witoto tribe who has volunteered to provide the only frontline care protecting her indigenous community of 700 families from the COVID-19 outbreak, wears a face mask that reads "Indigenous lives matter" as she puts on PPE before leaving her home in Parque das Trios, Taruma district, Manaus, Brazil, on April 26, 2020. "Our people are dying from this disease here and they are not being recognised as indigenous people by the state and Sesai," she said. (Image: Reuters)
Camila Hormazabal, a 24-year-old sex worker, uses laptops to meet virtually with customers in Concepcion, Chile April 7, 2020. Hormazabal reinvented herself offering sexual services online after the nightclub where she had worked was closed due to the outbreak of the coronavirus. (Image: Reuters)
Camila Hormazabal, a 24-year-old sex worker, uses laptops to meet virtually with customers in Concepcion, Chile, on April 7, 2020. Hormazabal reinvented herself offering sexual services online after the nightclub where she had worked was closed due to the outbreak of the coronavirus. (Image: Reuters)
Newborn baby Phuc An, wearing a protective face shield, is carried by his mother Nguyen Huyen Trang, a local bank auditor, as he receives vaccinations at home in Hanoi, Vietnam April 13, 2020. Phuc An was born at Vinmec hospital in Hanoi on April 1, when the Southeast Asian country started its strict restrictions on movement to contain the spread of the coronavirus. The lockdown put most of the social and economic activities throughout the country on hold, but life must go on, and giving birth couldn't be delayed. (Image: Reuters)
Newborn baby Phuc An, wearing a protective face shield, is carried by his mother Nguyen Huyen Trang, a local bank auditor, as he receives vaccinations at home in Hanoi, Vietnam, on April 13, 2020. Phuc An was born at Vinmec hospital in Hanoi on April 1, when the Southeast Asian country started its strict restrictions on movement to contain the spread of the coronavirus. The lockdown put most of the social and economic activities throughout the country on hold, but life must go on, and giving birth couldn't be delayed. (Image: Reuters)
Women stand in a queue to receive relief supplies provided by local community amid the coronavirus outbreak in Dhaka, Bangladesh, April 1, 2020. (Image: Reuters)
Women stand in a queue to receive relief supplies provided by local community amid the coronavirus outbreak in Dhaka, Bangladesh, on April 1, 2020. (Image: Reuters)
Reuters

stay updated

Get Daily News on your Browser
Sections