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In Pics: From Gudi Padva to Ugadi; people ignore rising COVID cases to celebrate the New Year

The rising COVID-19 cases in the country hasn't stop people from celebrating the festivals. Large gathering is observed despite the restrictions.

April 14, 2021 / 03:59 PM IST
India being a community of diversity has many festivals and each day stands different meaning to each community. This month of April marks the beginning of New Year for many Indian communities. Celebrations for Ugadi, Cheti Chand, Navreh and Bohag Bihu marks new year for various communities. (Image source: Reuters)
India being a nation of diversity has many festivals and each day stands different meaning to each community. The month of April marks the beginning of New Year for many Indian communities. Festivals like Gudi Padva, Ugadi, Baisakhi, Cheti Chand, Navreh and Bohag Bihu falls in this month. The rising covid- cases in the country hasn't stop people from celebrating these festivals. Large gathering is observed despite the restrictions. (Representative Image: Reuters)
Ugadi (Telugu: ఉగాది, romanized: Ugādi) or Yugadi (Kannada: ಯುಗಾದಿ, romanized: Yugādi), also known as Samvatsarādi (lit. 'Beginning of the Year'), is the New Year's Day for the States of Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, Karnataka in India.[2] It is festively observed in these regions on the first day of the Hindu lunisolar calendar month of Chaitra.[3] This typically falls in April month of the Gregorian calendar. (Image: AFP)
Ugadi or Yugadi , also known as Samvatsarādi, is the New Year's Day for the States of Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, Karnataka in India. It is festively observed in these regions on the first day of the Hindu lunisolar calendar month of Chaitra. This typically falls in April month of the Gregorian calendar. (Image: AFP)
Hindu devotees visit the Tirumala Tirupati Devasthanams temple on the occasion of 'Ugadi' festival or new year's day as per the Hindu lunisolar calendar in Chennai on April 13, 2021. (Photo by Arun SANKAR / AFP)
Hindu devotees visit the Tirumala Tirupati Devasthanams temple on the occasion of 'Ugadi' festival or new year's day as per the Hindu lunisolar calendar in Chennai on April 13, 2021. (Image: AFP)
also pronounced as Baisakhi is observed by Hindus and Sikhs. It also marks the beginning of Hindu solar New year.[5][6] Vaisakhi marks the first day of the month of Vaisakha, is usually celebrated on 13 or 14 April every year and is a historical and religious festival in Hinduism. This holiday is also known as Vaisakha Sankranti and celebrates the Solar new year, based on the Hindu Vikram Samvat calendar. It is additionally a spring harvest festival for many Indians.[7] For Hindus, the festival is their traditional solar new year, a harvest festival, an occasion to bath in sacred rivers such as Ganges, Jhelum, and Kaveri, visit temples, meet friends and take part in other festivities. In other parts of India, the Vaisakhi festival is known by various regional names
Baisakhi also known as Vaisakhi is observed by Hindus and Sikhs. The festival marks the beginning of Hindu solar New year. Vaisakhi marks the first day of the month of Vaisakha, is usually celebrated on 13 or 14 April every year. It has been a harvest festival in Punjab - an area of northern India - for a long time, even before it became so important to Sikhs. (Image: AFP)
Sikh devotees gather at the Golden Temple on the occasion of the Baisakhi festival, in Amritsar on April 13, 2021. (Photo by NARINDER NANU / AFP)
Sikh devotees gather at the Golden Temple on the occasion of the Baisakhi festival, in Amritsar on April 13, 2021. (Image: AFP)
Vishu Kani or Vishu – a festival typical to Kerala -- marks the beginning of the Malayali new year. This also falls on either April 14 or 15 and is celebrated by wearing new clothes and praying to an incarnation of Lord Vishnu. (Image: AFP) Devotees gather at a temple to offer prayers to mark the 'Vishu' festival in Chennai on April 14, 2021. (Photo by Arun SANKAR / AFP)
Devotees gather at a temple to offer prayers to mark the 'Vishu' festival in Chennai on April 14, 2021. (Image: AFP)
Devotees offer prayers at Pazhavangadi Ganapathi Temple in Thiruvananthapuram on the occasion of Vishu. (Image: ANI)
Devotees offer prayers at Pazhavangadi Ganapathi Temple in Thiruvananthapuram on the occasion of Vishu. (Image: ANI)
Bohag Bihu also known as Rongai Bihu marks the begining of the Assamese New Year or the harvesing season. In 2021, it begins from April 14 and ends on April 20. It is mainly celebrated over a period of 7 days or pinnacle phases - 'Sot', 'Raati', 'Goru', 'Manuh', 'Kutum', 'Mela' and 'Sera'. The first phase is performed around an ancient tree or an open field lit and for the last phase, people end the celebrations by contemplating their future goals and plans. Families also exchange an Assamese sweet called Pitha. They seek the blessings of the almighty for a prosperous year while farmers extend gratitude for a good harvest. (Image: AFP)
Bohag Bihu also known as Rongai Bihu marks the begining of the Assamese New Year or the harvesing season. In 2021, it begins from April 14 and ends on April 20. It is mainly celebrated over a period of 7 days or pinnacle phases - 'Sot', 'Raati', 'Goru', 'Manuh', 'Kutum', 'Mela' and 'Sera'. The first phase is performed around an ancient tree or an open field lit and for the last phase, people end the celebrations by contemplating their future goals and plans. Families also exchange an Assamese sweet called Pitha. They seek the blessings of the almighty for a prosperous year while farmers extend gratitude for a good harvest. (Image: ANI)
Artists performed #Bihu dance in Guwahati on Tuesday, a day before the beginning of Rongali Bihu celebrations. "All the artists had tested negative for COVID-19," said an organiser of the event.
Artists performed Bihu dance in Guwahati on Tuesday, a day before the beginning of Rongali Bihu celebrations. "All the artists had tested negative for COVID-19," said an organiser of the event.
Navreh or the Kashmiri New YEar
Navreh or the Kashmiri New Year is the celebration of the first day of the Kashmiri new year by Kashmiri Hindus, with the largest Kashmiri Hindu community being the Kashmiri Pandits. The word 'Navreh' is derived from Sanskrit 'Nava Varsha' meaning the New Year. Kashmiri Pandits dedicate Navreh festival to their Goddess Sharika and pay homage to her during the festival. It takes place on the first day of the bright half (Shukl Paksh) on the month of Chaitra (March–April) of the Kashmiri Hindu calendar. Here, Kashmiri Pandits performed puja at Sheetal Nath Temple in Kral Khud, Srinagar on Navreh April 13. Local Muslims also participated in the celebrations. "Kashmiri Pandits & Muslims are coming together again. Pandits are an integral part of Kashmiri society," a local said. (Image: ANI)
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first published: Apr 14, 2021 01:45 pm

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