Moneycontrol PRO
UPCOMING EVENT:Join us for New HorAIzon from Oct 6-7, 2pm and be a part of exciting conversations on tech & innovation
you are here: HomeNewscoronavirus

COVID-19 update | No evidence that children will be severely affected in third wave, says AIIMS director Dr Randeep Guleria

Guleria's comment comes a day after the Indian Academy of Paediatrics has said that though kids remain susceptible to COVID-19 infection, it is “highly unlikely that the third wave will predominantly or exclusively affect children”.

May 24, 2021 / 06:16 PM IST
Bharat Biotech, the Hyderabad-based COVID-19 vaccine maker, recently received approval from the Drugs Controller General of India to conduct clinical trials on children between the age of 2 and 18 (Representative image: PTI)

Bharat Biotech, the Hyderabad-based COVID-19 vaccine maker, recently received approval from the Drugs Controller General of India to conduct clinical trials on children between the age of 2 and 18 (Representative image: PTI)

There is no evidence that children would be severely affected in the third wave of COVID-19, AIIMS Director Randeep Guleria said on May 24

Guleria's comment came a day after the Indian Academy of Paediatrics (IAP) has said that though children remain susceptible to COVID-19 infection, it was “highly unlikely that the third wave will predominantly or exclusively affect children”

"Data shows that the COVID-19 infection is less frequent among children. Even if it infects children, it is mild. This pattern has been similar in both the first and second wave though the virus is the same. So there is no indication that the third wave will infect more children,"  Guleria said in response to a journalist at the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare's routine presser on May 24.

"There is no evidence that children will be infected more in the third wave," he repeated.

COVID-19 vaccine | Bharat Biotech to begin Covaxin trial for 2-18 age group on June 1

Close

COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

View more
How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

View more
Show

Earlier, the ministry's Joint Secretary, Lav Agarwal, said that the pattern of infection among age groups in both waves has been similar. "We have noted that the mortality has also been primarily reported among people who are either 60+ in age or have co-morbidities," Agarwal said.

In an advisory issued on May 23, IAP said that almost 90 per cent of the infections in children so far have been mild or asymptomatic.

Last week, NITI Aayog member (Health) Dr VK Paul had said that children contract COVID-19, contradictory to popular assumptions, and can spread the virus. He, however, said they almost always have mild infection and that mortality is very low in them.

As much as 26 percent of the population in India is less than 14 years of age and nearly seven percent are less than five years old.

The ministry has also noted that for the last 17 days, there is a steady decline in daily new COVID-19 cases in India. There has been a 2.6 times increase in the number of COVID tests done in the past 15 weeks in the country along with a steady dip in the weekly positivity rate reported in the last two weeks.

On May 23, Bharat Biotech said that it was planning to start the pediatric trial of its indigenously made COVID-19 vaccine Covaxin in June. The Hyderabad-based vaccine maker recently received approval from the Drugs Controller General of India to conduct clinical trials on children between the age of 2 and 18.

Agarwal also said that the government was trying to facilitate procurement of Pfizer, Moderna vaccines through central level coordination

"We are working on regulatory facilitation in terms of approval, and procurement-related facilitation. Order books of Pfizer, Moderna are full most of the time. It depends on their surplus how much they can provide to India. They will come back to the Government of India and we will then ensure vaccine facilitation at the state level," he said.

With PTI inputs
Moneycontrol News

stay updated

Get Daily News on your Browser
Sections
ISO 27001 - BSI Assurance Mark