Moneycontrol PRO
Upcoming Webinar:Watch Kushal Bhagi of Tortuga Wealth Managers decode how you can maximise your MF investments on Sept 21 @11am. Register Now
you are here: HomeNewsTrendsHealth

COVID-19: Covishield, Covaxin and Sputnik will be sold at these prices at private hospitals

COVID Vaccine Prices: The rates announced by the government are based on the current prices declared by manufacturer of Covishield, Covaxin and Sputnik vaccines and could be suitably modified in future if manufacturers change the prices

June 09, 2021 / 08:10 AM IST
Based on aggregate demand, the Centre will facilitate supply of these vaccines to the private hospitals(Representative image)

Based on aggregate demand, the Centre will facilitate supply of these vaccines to the private hospitals(Representative image)

The government on June 8 fixed maximum price that private hospitals can charge for each dose of Covishield, Covaxin and Sputnik V vaccines against COVID-19 at private hospitals.

The hospitals can charge a maximum of Rs 780 for a dose of Covishield, Rs 1,410 for a dose of Covaxin and Rs 1,145 for a for a dose of Sputnik-V vaccine, according to the order issued by Union Ministry of Health and Family Welfare. The move comes amid allegations of profiteering against private hospitals.

The cost includes taxes as well as Rs 150 service charge for the hospitals.

READ: As PM Modi centralizes vaccine procurement, FinMin to seek Parliamentary approval for more funds

The order comes after the Ministry issued revised guidelines for vaccination earlier in the day. The guidelines said that the price of vaccines for private hospitals would be declared by each manufacturer, and any subsequent change would be notified in advance.

Close

COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

View more
How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

View more
Show

Prime Minister Modi, in his televised address on June 7, announced a new centralised policy for vaccination, according to which the vaccines will be provided for free to all eligible persons in government-run hospitals. The vaccine manufacturers can, however, provide vaccines directly to private hospitals, as per the new policy. This has been restricted to 25 percent of the manufacturer’s monthly production.

The rates announced by the government are based on the current prices declared by manufacturer of the three vaccines and could be suitably modified in future if manufacturers change the prices, said the office memorandum signed by Health Ministry’s additional secretary and addressed to all additional chief secretaries, principal secretaries, secretaries of health and family welfare departments of states and Union Territories.

Also, read: SC questions govt’s vaccination policy, seeks data on purchase history, ordered quantities, supplies

The Centre has also asked the states not to allow private hospitals to levy more than Rs 150 as service charge. The state governments have to monitor the private hospitals regularly and strict action will be taken against any private vaccination centre for over charging as per the rules.

Also, read: Centre's revised Vaccination Policy: Here are the 5 unanswered questions in the new guidelines

The government said earlier in the day that it has placed an order for 44 crore COVID-19 vaccine doses. This includes 25 Crore Covishield from Serum Institute of India and 19 Crore doses of Covaxin from Bharat Biotech.
Moneycontrol News

stay updated

Get Daily News on your Browser
Sections
ISO 27001 - BSI Assurance Mark