Govt, administration, public - all dropped guard after first COVID wave: RSS Chief Mohan Bhagwat

Addressing a lecture series 'Positivity Unlimited', RSS Chief Mohan Bhagwat said the country should stay united and work as a team in these testing times, instead of pointing fingers at each other.

May 15, 2021 / 07:13 PM IST

After the first wave of COVID-19, the government, administration and public dropped their guard which led to the current situation, RSS chief Mohan Bhagwat said on Saturday and urged people to stay positive and proactive to fight the pandemic.

Addressing a lecture series 'Positivity Unlimited', Bhagwat said the country should stay united and work as a team in these testing times, instead of pointing fingers at each other.

"We are facing this situation because, whether it was the government, administration or public, everyone dropped their guard after the first wave despite indications from doctors," he said.

Bhagwat said there is talk of a third wave.

Follow our LIVE blog for latest updates of the novel coronavirus pandemic

Close

COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

View more
How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

View more
Show

But, "we will not be scared. We shall stand like a rock."

"We have to stay positive and take precautions to keep ourselves COVID negative in the present situation," he said.

The RSS chief said that this is not an appropriate time to point fingers and all should avoid making irrational remarks.

Citing England's situation in World War II when everything seemed going against it, Bhagwat said a quote was written on the then prime minister Winston Churchill's desk which read, "There is no pessimism in this office. We are not interested in the possibilities of defeat. They don't exist".

Similarly, he said, in this situation "we can't give up on courage. We need to also have steely resolve."

Follow our full coverage of the coronavirus pandemic here.
PTI
first published: May 15, 2021 07:13 pm

stay updated

Get Daily News on your Browser
Sections