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COVID-19 | Karnataka relaxes restrictions from July 5 – All you need to know

The relaxations were announced for 15 days by Chief Minister BS Yediyurappa after chairing a meeting with his Cabinet colleagues and senior officials on July 3.

July 04, 2021 / 01:00 PM IST
Karnataka re-imposed restrictions from April 27 during the second coronavirus wave in the country. The rules were most stringent from May 10 to June 14 and have since been gradually relaxed. (Image: AFP)

Karnataka re-imposed restrictions from April 27 during the second coronavirus wave in the country. The rules were most stringent from May 10 to June 14 and have since been gradually relaxed. (Image: AFP)

The Karnataka government has announced relaxation in the COVID-19 lockdown imposed in the state, from July 5. The new guidelines will be in place till July 19.

Notably, while the weekend curfew has been lifted, the night curfew will continue from 9 pm to 5 am.

The relaxations were announced for 15 days by Chief Minister BS Yediyurappa after chairing a meeting with his Cabinet colleagues and senior officials on July 3.

He added that relaxations will apply across the state, except in Kodagu. "We have eased restrictions everywhere. There is some problem in Kodagu district. The deputy commissioner of the district will take a decision," he said.

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Here is all you need to know:

- The restrictions are relaxed from July 5 and will continue till July 19.

- Weekend curfew is lifted.

- Night curfew will continue from 9 pm to 5 am, instead of the previous 7 pm to 5 am. No movement allowed during the curfew except for essential activities.

- The state government has authorised the deputy commissioners of the districts to decide on easing or imposing restrictions.

- Cinemas, pubs and theatres not allowed to open.

- Swimming pools are allowed to open only for competitive training purposes.

- Sports complexes and stadia can be opened only for practice.

- All educational institutions, tutorials and colleges would remain shut until further orders.

- Social, political, entertainment, academic, cultural, religious functions and other gatherings and large congregations have been prohibited.

- Weddings and family functions are permitted with the presence of not more than 100 people.

- Cremation and funerals would be allowed with a maximum of 20 people.

- Religious places will be allowed to open only for Darshan.

- Public transportation is allowed to function up to seating capacity – e.g. no standing passengers allowed in buses.

- Shops, restaurants, malls, and private offices have to enforce COVID-appropriate behaviour failing which action will be initiated under the Disaster Management Act, 2005.

- Deputy Commissioners of the districts may impose additional containment measures based on the assessment of the COVID situation and after consultation with the district-in-charge Minister.

Activities are allowed during night curfew period

- Patients and their attendants or persons requiring emergency needs.

- Industries or companies requiring night operations shall be permitted to operate. However, employees will require valid ID or authorisation issued by their organisation or institution.

Rules for offices

- Telecom and internets service providers’ employees are allowed to move with valid company ID cards.

- Only essential staff or employees of IT and ITeS companies or organisation shall work from office. The remaining staff are to continue working from home.

- Medical, emergency and essential services, including pharmacies, shall be fully functional but other commercial activities are prohibited.

- Movement of goods through trucks, goods vehicles or goods carriers, including empty vehicles are allowed.

- Home delivery of goods and operations of e-commerce companies are allowed.

State Chief Secretary P Ravi Kumar also said that “strict” COVID-appropriate behaviour such as wearing face masks, maintaining physical distance at public places and hand hygiene, should be maintained.

Karnataka re-imposed restrictions from April 27 during the second coronavirus wave in the country. The rules were most stringent from May 10 to June 14 and have since been gradually relaxed.

The state has reported 2,082 fresh COVID-19 cases, 86 fatalities and 48,116 active cases today.

For full coverage on the coronavirus pandemic click here

(With inputs from PTI)
Jocelyn Fernandes
first published: Jul 4, 2021 01:00 pm

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