56-year-old woman dies after vaccination in Gurugram; not linked to COVID-19 vaccine, says Health Ministry

So far, 11 COVID-19 vaccine beneficiaries have required hospitalisation post-vaccination; the hospitalisation percentage against vaccination is currently 0.0007 percent in India.

January 23, 2021 / 09:40 PM IST
A healthcare worker receives a dose of Covishield, a COVID-19 vaccine manufactured by Serum Institute of India, at a government-run hospital at Baruipur on the outskirts of Kolkata. (Image: Reuters)

A healthcare worker receives a dose of Covishield, a COVID-19 vaccine manufactured by Serum Institute of India, at a government-run hospital at Baruipur on the outskirts of Kolkata. (Image: Reuters)

Additional Health Secretary Manohar Agnani informed on January 23 that a total of six deaths post COVID-19 vaccination have been reported in India so far, including that of a 56-year-old woman in Gurugram.

However, the government has denied there is any link between the deaths and COVID-19 vaccination.

The Health Ministry has said that the postmortem report of the woman has confirmed that she died of cardiopulmonary disease and not due to the vaccine.

Agnani said: “A total of 6 deaths have been reported so far. A 56-year-old woman has died in Gurugram in the last 24 hours. None of the deaths has been casually linked with COVID-19 vaccination.”

So far, 11 vaccine beneficiaries have required hospitalisation post-vaccination; the hospitalisation percentage against vaccination is currently 0.0007 percent in India.

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COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

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How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

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As of 6 pm on January 23, a total of 1,46,598 beneficiaries across 27 states and union territories got their first COVID-19 vaccine shots on the eighth day of India’s COVID-19 vaccination drive.

A total of 15,37,190 beneficiaries have been vaccinated for COVID-19 across 27,776 vaccination sessions in India so far, the Health Ministry informed.

India rolled out the first phase of its COVID-19 vaccination drive on January 16 for healthcare and frontline workers.

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