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Last Updated : Sep 26, 2020 12:01 PM IST | Source: Moneycontrol.com

15 psychological tricks and tactics marketers use to make you buy more

TitleMax, a privately-owned title lending business headquartered in United States, has listed 29 different psychological tricks and tactics that marketers try to het consumers to buy more.

Have you ever wondered that sometime you purchase something even though you don’t need the? Well this happens with everyone. Promotion methods of marketers influence the buyers in a way to change their perception and attract customers to buy their products. TitleMax, a privately owned title lending business headquartered in United States, has listed 29 different psychological tricks and tactics that marketers try to het consumers to buy more. These tricks and methods toy with your mind, infiltrate your senses, and tap into your emotions to override analytical thought. Let’s take a look 15 marketing tricks and tactics listed by TitleMax. (Image: Unsplash)

Have you ever wondered that sometime you purchase something even though you don’t need it? Well this happens with everyone. Promotion methods of marketers influence buyers in a way to change their perception and attract customers to buy their products. TitleMax, a privately owned title lending business headquartered in United States, has listed 29 different psychological tricks and tactics that marketers try to get consumers to buy more. These tricks and methods toy with your mind, infiltrate your senses, and tap into your emotions to override analytical thought. Let’s take a look at the 15 marketing tricks and tactics listed by TitleMax. (Image: Unsplash)

No. 1 | Remove the comma | Research shows that removing commas makes a price seem lower ($1,699 vs. $1699).

No. 1 | Remove the comma | Research shows that removing commas makes a price seem lower ($1,699 vs. $1699).

No. 2 | Use words related to a small amount | Descriptions like ‘low maintenance’ are more appealing to consumers than ‘high performance,’ even though both qualities are valued. (Representative Image: Unsplash)

No. 2 | Use words related to a small amount | Descriptions like ‘low maintenance’ are more appealing to consumers than ‘high performance’, even though both qualities are valued. (Representative Image: Unsplash)

No. 3 | Odd-even pricing | Consumers are more likely to choose something at a price ending in an odd number that is right under an even whole number, like $4.97. (Image: Unsplash)

No. 3 | Odd-even pricing | Consumers are more likely to choose something at a price ending in an odd number that is right under an even whole number, like $4.97. (Image: Unsplash)

No. 4 | False sense of urgency | Regardless of these statements being true or not, they create a sense of urgency that overrides careful purchase planning.

No. 4 | False sense of urgency | Regardless of these statements being true or not, they create a sense of urgency that overrides careful purchase planning.

No. 5 | Visual contrast between sale prices | Visual distinction between the sale price and original price is powerful. If the original (higher price) is bold, big, and a different color, that will make the sale price seem more appealing.

No. 5 | Visual contrast between sale prices | Visual distinction between the sale price and original price is powerful. If the original (higher price) is bold, big, and a different color, that will make the sale price seem more appealing.

No. 6 | Maximize the perceived size of the discount | Retailers use the biggest number possible to label discounts. For example, 20% off a $50 vacuum seems better than $10 off, even though they’re both the same amount.

No. 6 | Maximize the perceived size of the discount | Retailers use the biggest number possible to label discounts. For example, 20% off a $50 vacuum seems better than $10 off, even though they’re both the same amount. (Image: Pexel)

No. 7 | Red prices for men | Studies show that men are more likely to buy products when the prices are displayed in red. Men seem to process ads more quickly and use color as a visual heuristic, and ‘red’ equals ‘discount.’

No. 7 | Red prices for men | Studies show that men are more likely to buy products when the prices are displayed in red. Men seem to process ads more quickly and use color as a visual heuristic, and ‘red’ equals ‘discount.’

No. 8 | Make products seem expensive to manufacture | Consumers want to pay what they believe is fair, so statements like ‘our coffee is 100% organic’ are more effective than ‘our coffee is delicious.’ Mentioning top-of-the-line raw materials make people feel better about spending more money.

No. 8 | Make products seem expensive to manufacture | Consumers want to pay what they believe is fair, so statements like ‘our coffee is 100% organic’ are more effective than ‘our coffee is delicious.’ Mentioning top-of-the-line raw materials make people feel better about spending more money.

No. 9 | Calm, slow music | Quiet, calm, and slow music encourages shoppers to spend more time in the store. Alternatively, faster music speeds up the heart rate, moving people out of restaurants faster. (Image: Pexel)

No. 9 | Calm, slow music | Quiet, calm, and slow music encourages shoppers to spend more time in the store. Alternatively, faster music speeds up the heart rate, moving people out of restaurants faster. (Image: Pexel)

No. 10 | Social proof | People are more willing to do something if other people are doing it. Using reviews and testimonials as part of advertising earns trust. However, reviews are not always what they seem. (Image: freepik.com)

No. 10 | Social proof | People are more willing to do something if other people are doing it. Using reviews and testimonials as part of advertising earns trust. However, reviews are not always what they seem. (Image: freepik.com)

No. 11 | Include an expensive menu item most people won’t buy | By having a $50 dish on the menu, diners are more likely to shell out $30 for other menu items because the cost seems reasonable in comparison. This is called ‘arbitrary coherence.’ (Image: Unsplash)

No. 11 | Include an expensive menu item most people won’t buy | By having a $50 dish on the menu, diners are more likely to shell out $30 for other menu items because the cost seems reasonable in comparison. This is called ‘arbitrary coherence.’ (Image: Unsplash)

No. 12 | Buy one, get one free | BOGO compels people to buy something at full price and often spend more than intended. Prices are set high enough to cover the ‘free’ item. These have all but replaced 50%-off sales, even though half-off deals benefit consumers more. (Image: Shutterstock)

No. 12 | Buy one, get one free | BOGO compels people to buy something at full price and often spend more than intended. Prices are set high enough to cover the ‘free’ item. These have all but replaced 50%-off sales, even though half-off deals benefit consumers more. (Image: Shutterstock)

No. 13 | A bright, colorful entrance | Stores often fill their entrances with colorful merchandise (such as fresh produce) to brighten moods and encourage more spending. (Image: Unsplash)

No. 13 | A bright, colorful entrance | Stores often fill their entrances with colorful merchandise (such as fresh produce) to brighten moods and encourage more spending. (Image: Unsplash)

No. 14 | Decoy pricing | Imagine that a small popcorn is $4, a medium is $8, and a large is $8.50. Many people will go for the large since it is ‘only 50 cents more’ than the medium. The medium only exists to boost sales of the large. (Image: Twitter)

No. 14 | Decoy pricing | Imagine that a small popcorn is $4, a medium is $8, and a large is $8.50. Many people will go for the large since it is ‘only 50 cents more’ than the medium. The medium only exists to boost sales of the large. (Image: Twitter)

No. 15 | Remove the pain of paying | Uber revolutionized the taxi industry by having customers pay transparently before service is received. This is way less painful than watching a meter rise as you ride and THEN paying.

No. 15 | Remove the pain of paying | Uber revolutionized the taxi industry by having customers pay transparently before service is received. This is way less painful than watching a meter rise as you ride and THEN paying.

First Published on Sep 26, 2020 12:01 pm
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