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Using science and celtic wisdom to save trees

The goal of Diana Beresford-Kroeger, a medical biochemist, is to combat the climate crisis by fighting for what’s left of the great forests  and rebuilding what’s already come down.

February 25, 2022 / 08:40 PM IST
Representational image. Source: IANS

Representational image. Source: IANS

There aren’t many scientists raised in the ways of Druids by Celtic medicine women, but there is at least one. She lives in the woods of Canada, in a forest she helped grow. From there, wielding just a pencil, she has been working to save some of the oldest life-forms on Earth by bewitching its humans.

At a hale 77, Diana Beresford-Kroeger is a medical biochemist, botanist, organic chemist, poet, author and developer of artificial blood. But her main focus for decades now has been to telegraph to the world, in prose that is scientifically exacting yet startlingly affecting, the wondrous capabilities of trees.

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Beresford-Kroeger’s goal is to combat the climate crisis by fighting for what’s left of the great forests (she says the vast boreal wilderness that stretches across the Northern Hemisphere is as vital as the Amazon) and rebuilding what’s already come down. Trees store carbon dioxide and oxygenate the air, making them “the best and only thing we have right now to fight climate change and do it fast,” she said.