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Coronavirus pandemic | Virus crisis hasn't ruined Manchester United striker Rashford's recovery

Rashford sustained a double stress fracture in an FA Cup tie against Wolves that initially looked set to rule him out of the rest of the campaign.

March 28, 2020 / 06:42 PM IST

Manchester United striker Marcus Rashford says his recovery from the back injury that has sidelined him since January has not been affected by the coronavirus crisis.

Rashford sustained a double stress fracture in an FA Cup tie against Wolves that initially looked set to rule him out of the rest of the campaign.

But, with the pandemic postponing the Premier League season until at least April 30, Rashford has an opportunity to get back in action if the campaign can resume.

"I feel much better. I have a scan in another couple of days so it'll solidify it then but I feel, comparing it to two or three weeks ago, 10 times better and for me now it's just about getting ready to build it back up to training and playing games with the team," Rashford told Sky Sports News on Saturday.

"I'm in a much better place, I'm much happier than I was about a month ago so things are looking positive."

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How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

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There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

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Despite government advice to stay at home during the pandemic, Rashford said the situation has had little impact on his fitness recovery work.

"Everyone is just dealing with the circumstances as well as they can," he said.

"I've just been in my house, doing my gym and recovery work, reading books, watching Netflix, just whatever you can do to make the time pass really.

"I'm fortunate enough to have a bike in the gym downstairs so not much in that sense has actually changed for me because I can still do my daily routine that I was doing."
PTI
first published: Mar 28, 2020 06:42 pm

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