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Last Updated : Sep 06, 2018 08:32 PM IST | Source: Moneycontrol.com

Section 377 verdict: India joins countries where protests led to decriminalisation of gay sex

Women and men had to take to the streets in these countries to fight for equal rights for the LGBT community.

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The Netherlands | In 2001, the European nation became the first country in the world to legalise same-sex marriages. The then mayor of Amsterdam commemorated the landmark judgement by getting four gay couples married. Behind the pomp and splendour was a 15-year crusade in the country. Until 1973, homosexuality was considered an illness and Dutch mental health institutions offered treatment for the same. However, a surge in domestic tolerance coupled with post-World War II LGBT rights movement galvanized liberalisation and contributed to the legalisation of homosexuality. (Image: Reuters)
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The Netherlands | In 2001, the European nation became the first country in the world to legalise same-sex marriages. The then mayor of Amsterdam commemorated the landmark judgement by getting four gay couples married. Behind the pomp and splendour was a 15-year crusade in the country. Until 1973, homosexuality was considered an illness and Dutch mental health institutions offered treatment for the same. However, a surge in domestic tolerance coupled with post-World War II LGBT rights movement galvanized liberalisation and contributed to the legalisation of homosexuality. (Image: Reuters)

Germany | Prior to the Nazi era, the country was fairly tolerant towards homosexuality, albeit without a legal status. However, under Adolf Hitler's regime, thousands of homosexuals were prosecuted. Post-World War II, the Nazi extensions were repealed and gay sex was decriminalised in both East and West Germany in 1968 and 1969, respectively. Efforts by pro-gay politicians and Akademie Waldschlosschen, a national networking hub for LGBT, have transformed it into one of the most gay-friendly countries in the world. (Image: Reuters)
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Germany | Prior to the Nazi era, the country was fairly tolerant towards homosexuality, albeit without a legal status. However, under Adolf Hitler's regime, thousands of homosexuals were prosecuted. Post-World War II, the Nazi extensions were repealed and gay sex was decriminalised in both East and West Germany in 1968 and 1969, respectively. Efforts by pro-gay politicians and Akademie Waldschlosschen, a national networking hub for LGBT, have transformed it into one of the most gay-friendly countries in the world. (Image: Reuters)

US | Through the 20th century, events such as the Stonewall riots, which is considered the starting point of the modern gay liberation movement, cultivated public empathy towards homosexuality. In 2003, the Supreme Court ruling in Lawrence vs Texas made sexual activity between consenting adults of the same sex legal in all states across the country. (Image: Reuters)
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US | Through the 20th century, events such as the Stonewall riots, which is considered the starting point of the modern gay liberation movement, cultivated public empathy towards homosexuality. In 2003, the Supreme Court ruling in Lawrence vs Texas made sexual activity between consenting adults of the same sex legal in all states across the country. (Image: Reuters)

The Republic of Ireland | Apart from being known for its brewing culture, the country has pushed for LGBT rights. From being overwhelmingly conservative, the country has transformed into an overwhelmingly liberal one, in the space of a generation. The relentless work of civil rights activist David Norris and the Campaign for Homosexual Law Reform rendered gay sex a legal status by 1993. (Image: Reuters)
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The Republic of Ireland | Apart from being known for its brewing culture, the country has pushed for LGBT rights. From being overwhelmingly conservative, the country has transformed into an overwhelmingly liberal one, in the space of a generation. The relentless work of civil rights activist David Norris and the Campaign for Homosexual Law Reform rendered gay sex a legal status by 1993. (Image: Reuters)

South Africa | Despite state opposition, several homosexual rights groups started forming in the country in late 1970s, however, most of them were divided along racial lines. Tensions between different LGBT groups extended even to politics and the underlying issue never came to the forefront. It was only in the post-apartheid era, that it came in the public eye and in 1998 South Africa finally granted legal status to gay sex between consenting adults. (Image: Reuters)
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South Africa | Despite state opposition, several homosexual rights groups started forming in the country in late 1970s, however, most of them were divided along racial lines. Tensions between different LGBT groups extended even to politics and the underlying issue never came to the forefront. It was only in the post-apartheid era, that it came in the public eye and in 1998 South Africa finally granted legal status to gay sex between consenting adults. (Image: Reuters)

Canada | Homosexuality attained legal status in the country in 1969 when the Criminal Law Amendment Act came into force upon royal assent. Prior to this, offenders were given capital punishment, which was often changed to the death penalty. In the battle leading up to the legalisation of homosexuality, then Justice Minister and Attorney General of Canada, Pierre Trudeau famously said, "There's no place for the state in the bedrooms of the nation." (Image: Reuters)
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Canada | Homosexuality attained legal status in the country in 1969 when the Criminal Law Amendment Act came into force upon royal assent. Prior to this, offenders were given capital punishment, which was often changed to the death penalty. In the battle leading up to the legalisation of homosexuality, then Justice Minister and Attorney General of Canada, Pierre Trudeau famously said, "There's no place for the state in the bedrooms of the nation." (Image: Reuters)

New Zealand | The first seeds towards liberalisation of homosexuality in the country were sown in 1972, when academician Ngahuia Te Awekotuku was denied a visitors permit to the US, on the grounds that she was homosexual. The incident gained traction nationwide and gay liberation groups started popping up in cities such as Wellington, Christchurch and Auckland. Through the 1970s, the gay movement gained eminence in the country and gay sex between consenting men attained legal status in 1986. (Image: Reuters)
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New Zealand | The first seeds towards liberalisation of homosexuality in the country were sown in 1972, when academician Ngahuia Te Awekotuku was denied a visitors permit to the US, on the grounds that she was homosexual. The incident gained traction nationwide and gay liberation groups started popping up in cities such as Wellington, Christchurch and Auckland. Through the 1970s, the gay movement gained eminence in the country and gay sex between consenting men attained legal status in 1986. (Image: Reuters)

Argentina | Although, homosexuality was legal since 1853, there were no civil rights laws dedicated to protecting gay people. Homosexuality was looked down upon and desperation in men was blamed to be the leading cause for people "turning gay". However, in the 1970s, after LGBT rights organisation such as Nuestro Mundo and Safo were established, the plight of homosexuals came to the forefront. Together, they represented the homosexual liberation front and by the turn of the decade, public apathy and acceptance towards homosexuals started growing. (Image: Reuters)
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Argentina | Although, homosexuality was legal since 1853, there were no civil rights laws dedicated to protecting gay people. Homosexuality was looked down upon and desperation in men was blamed to be the leading cause for people "turning gay". However, in the 1970s, after LGBT rights organisation such as Nuestro Mundo and Safo were established, the plight of homosexuals came to the forefront. Together, they represented the homosexual liberation front and by the turn of the decade, public apathy and acceptance towards homosexuals started growing. (Image: Reuters)

UK | Through the 1950s, police actively enforced laws prohibiting sexual behaviour between men, which resulted in the prosecution of over 1,069 gay men in England and Wales. Death of scientist, mathematician, and war-time code-breaker Alan Turing and imprisonment of Edward Montagu, Michael Pitt-Rivers and Peter Wildeblood sparked public outrage which eventually led to the legalisation of homosexuality in 1967 in England and Wales, and later in Scotland and Northern Ireland. Except Northern Ireland, the remaining countries have granted a similar legal structure to marriage among homosexuals. (Image: Reuters)
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UK | Through the 1950s, police actively enforced laws prohibiting sexual behaviour between men, which resulted in the prosecution of over 1,069 gay men in England and Wales. Death of scientist, mathematician, and war-time code-breaker Alan Turing and imprisonment of Edward Montagu, Michael Pitt-Rivers and Peter Wildeblood sparked public outrage which eventually led to the legalisation of homosexuality in 1967 in England and Wales, and later in Scotland and Northern Ireland. Except Northern Ireland, the remaining countries have granted a similar legal structure to marriage among homosexuals. (Image: Reuters)

India | After taking in to account a clutch of petitions challenging criminalisation of homosexuality, the Supreme Court in a landmark judgement on September 6, finally decriminalised gay sex between consenting adults. (Image: Reuters)
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India | After taking in to account a clutch of petitions challenging criminalisation of homosexuality, the Supreme Court in a landmark judgement on September 6, finally decriminalised gay sex between consenting adults. (Image: Reuters)

First Published on Sep 6, 2018 08:32 pm
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