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Non-hospitalised COVID-19 patients have low risk of severe post-acute complications: Study

This was a Danish population-based cohort study using the Danish prescription, patient, and health insurance registries.

May 11, 2021 / 01:36 PM IST
Healthcare workers are seen at a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test centre in Faelledparken in Copenhagen, Denmark. (Representative image: Reuters)

Healthcare workers are seen at a coronavirus disease (COVID-19) test centre in Faelledparken in Copenhagen, Denmark. (Representative image: Reuters)

COVID-19 patients, who are not hospitalised after contracting the virus infection, have a low risk of severe post-acute complications, said a study. However, they report more visits to general practitioners following the infection, the study revealed.

“The absolute risk of severe post-acute complications after SARS-CoV-2 infection not requiring hospital admission is low. However, increases in visits to general practitioners and outpatient hospital visits could indicate COVID-19 sequelae," noted the study published in The Lancet.

This was a Danish population-based cohort study using the Danish prescription, patient, and health insurance registries.

As per the study, 10,498 eligible individuals were tested positive for COVID-19 in Denmark from February 27 to May 31, 2020. Of these, 8983 (85.6 percent) were alive and not admitted to the hospital two weeks after they tested positive. The matched coronavirus-negative reference population not admitted to the hospital consisted of 80,894 individuals.

For the study, the team examined incident drug use, hospital diagnoses, and overall healthcare use extending from two weeks to six months COVID-19 positive individuals who did not require hospital admission.

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COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

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How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

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Comparing the two populations, it was found that non-hospitalised COVID-19 patients were not at an increased risk of initiating new drugs, the study said.

Follow our LIVE blog for the latest updates of the novel coronavirus pandemic

Denmark has avoided a third wave of COVID-19 with broad lockdown measures introduced in December 2020, which drove down daily infections from several thousand to between 500 and 800 in recent months.

Following this, the Nordic country has announced plans to reopen schools and allow a range of indoor activities this week, but a cap on gatherings led to the cancellation of several summer music festivals, including the renowned Roskilde Festival.

"Denmark needs to get back to normal as fast as possible, and it has to happen responsibly," Health Minister Magnus Heunicke said on May 4.

(With inputs from agencies)

Follow our full coverage on COVID-19 here.
Moneycontrol News
first published: May 11, 2021 01:36 pm

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