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Last Updated : Nov 14, 2018 02:11 PM IST | Source: Moneycontrol.com

8 superheroes who made Stan Lee a super writer

Here is to the man, whose fertile imagination laid the foundation of the Silver Age of comic books

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Stan Lee, the man who gave us countless hours of pure mystic joy was a lot of things.. revolutionary, inspirational, controversial, outlandish but above all, he was utterly, utterly brilliant. The 'father of pop culture' not only pioneered the comic book industry but also gave us some of the most iconic villains and superheroes of the 20th century.
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Stan Lee, the man who gave us countless hours of pure mystic joy was a lot of things.. revolutionary, inspirational, controversial, outlandish but above all, he was utterly, utterly brilliant. The 'father of pop culture' not only pioneered the comic book industry but also gave us some of the most iconic villains and superheroes of the 20th century.

His complex storytelling coupled with larger-than-life superheroes paved the way for the Silver Age of Comic Books cementing Marvels at the helm of the industry. Lee passed away on November 12 after succumbing to a bout of pneumonia. However, with his caped superheroes, he left behind an incomparable legacy and a lasting belief. Here is to the man, whose fertile imagination laid the foundation of the Silver Age of comic books.
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His complex storytelling coupled with larger-than-life superheroes paved the way for the Silver Age of Comic Books cementing Marvels at the helm of the industry. Lee passed away on November 12 after succumbing to a bout of pneumonia. However, with his caped superheroes, he left behind an incomparable legacy and a lasting belief. Here is to the man, whose fertile imagination laid the foundation of the Silver Age of comic books.

Spider-Man | The character was first introduced in anthology comic book Amazing Fantasy #15 on August 1962. In an article appropriately titled, "How I Created Spider-Man" Stan Lee wrote that with the character, he wanted to create a bewildered, insecure, inept teenager who by some miracle had acquired superpowers. In Spider-Man, Lee saw his adolescence and what we got was Peter Parker who suffered from real-life social and financial issues, with an alter ego of a friendly, often misunderstood vigilante who crawled walls and at kept crime at bay in New York City. (Image: Pexel/Mike Navolta)
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Spider-Man | The character was first introduced in anthology comic book Amazing Fantasy #15 on August 1962. In an article appropriately titled, "How I Created Spider-Man" Stan Lee wrote that with the character, he wanted to create a bewildered, insecure, inept teenager who by some miracle had acquired superpowers. In Spider-Man, Lee saw his adolescence and what we got was Peter Parker who suffered from real-life social and financial issues, with an alter ego of a friendly, often misunderstood vigilante who crawled walls and at kept crime at bay in New York City. (Image: Pexel/Mike Navolta)

Iron Man | Lee was a master storyteller who often injected real-life social issues in his mythical comic book world. While characters such as The Incredible Hulk was American domestic and government responses to the Communist threat, Iron Man highlighted the industry's role in the struggle. Inspired by American business magnate, record-setting pilot, engineer Howard Hughes, Lee's Tony Stark is a quintessential American inventor who is bogged down by issues of entrepreneurial autonomy, government supervision while dealing with a hole in his chest. With Tony Stark, Lee gave us Marvel's version of Batman, who unlike his DC counterpart, is not afraid of stepping out of the shadow of his alter ego and might just be a tad smarter. (Image: Marvel)
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Iron Man | Lee was a master storyteller who often injected real-life social issues in his mythical comic book world. While characters such as The Incredible Hulk was American domestic and government responses to the Communist threat, Iron Man highlighted the industry's role in the struggle. Inspired by American business magnate, record-setting pilot, engineer Howard Hughes, Lee's Tony Stark is a quintessential American inventor who is bogged down by issues of entrepreneurial autonomy, government supervision while dealing with a hole in his chest. With Tony Stark, Lee gave us Marvel's version of Batman, who unlike his DC counterpart, is not afraid of stepping out of the shadow of his alter ego and might just be a tad smarter. (Image: Marvel)

X-Men | In a world where anti-mutant bigotry is fierce and widespread, X-Men, led by Professor Charles Xavier, are a ray of hope to establish peace and harmony between normal humans and mutants. The supergroup which was co-created by Jack Kirby first appeared in The X-Men #1 in 1963. With the X-Men storyline, Lee wanted to normalise the mutant culture in his Marvel Universe. He wanted to break the archetypes that superheroes were otherworldly beings and add a human connection to it by creating next-door characters who just happen to have superpowers. X-Men is not just a group of individuals with superhuman abilities, it is a system that is bounded by ethics, discipline and willingness to help each other. (Image: Flickr/BagoGames)
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X-Men | In a world where anti-mutant bigotry is fierce and widespread, X-Men, led by Professor Charles Xavier, are a ray of hope to establish peace and harmony between normal humans and mutants. The supergroup which was co-created by Jack Kirby first appeared in The X-Men #1 in 1963. With the X-Men storyline, Lee wanted to normalise the mutant culture in his Marvel Universe. He wanted to break the archetypes that superheroes were otherworldly beings and add a human connection to it by creating next-door characters who just happen to have superpowers. X-Men is not just a group of individuals with superhuman abilities, it is a system that is bounded by ethics, discipline and willingness to help each other. (Image: Flickr/BagoGames)

The Fantastic Four | The first supergroup created by the legendary collaboration of Stan Lee and Jack Kirby debuted in The Fantastic Four #1 on November 1961. The four-member team gained superpowers after exposure to cosmic rays during a scientific mission to outer space. While The Fantastic Four was allegedly Marvel's answer to DC's Justice League, the storyline once again focused on their somewhat dysfunctional, yet loving relationship as a family than their crime-fighting abilities. (Image: Flickr/BagoGames)
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The Fantastic Four | The first supergroup created by the legendary collaboration of Stan Lee and Jack Kirby debuted in The Fantastic Four #1 on November 1961. The four-member team gained superpowers after exposure to cosmic rays during a scientific mission to outer space. While The Fantastic Four was allegedly Marvel's answer to DC's Justice League, the storyline once again focused on their somewhat dysfunctional, yet loving relationship as a family than their crime-fighting abilities. (Image: Flickr/BagoGames)

Daredevil | The character first appeared in Daredevil #1 in 1964. Through Daredevil, Lee told us the story of Matt Murdock who lost his eyesight in a car accident which also heightened his remaining senses beyond normal human thresholds, enabling him to detect the shape and location of objects around him. Murdock's life takes the turn for the worse when his father boxer "Battling Jack" Murdock is killed and he is sent to an orphanage. While seeking revenge has been the story of his life, Murdock's ethically bent personality has made him a fan favourite. His arch-nemesis Kingpin, also created by Stan Lee, has also elevated his status in the Marvel universe, so much so that Daredevil now has a Netflix series which recently concluded its third season. (Image: Marvel)
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Daredevil | The character first appeared in Daredevil #1 in 1964. Through Daredevil, Lee told us the story of Matt Murdock who lost his eyesight in a car accident which also heightened his remaining senses beyond normal human thresholds, enabling him to detect the shape and location of objects around him. Murdock's life takes the turn for the worse when his father boxer "Battling Jack" Murdock is killed and he is sent to an orphanage. While seeking revenge has been the story of his life, Murdock's ethically bent personality has made him a fan favourite. His arch-nemesis Kingpin, also created by Stan Lee, has also elevated his status in the Marvel universe, so much so that Daredevil now has a Netflix series which recently concluded its third season. (Image: Marvel)

The Hulk | Lee's storytelling prowess once again came to light with the release of The Incredible Hulk in 1962. With its green-skinned, muscular humanoid possessing immense physical strength whose alter ego, Dr Bruce Banner is a weak, socially withdrawn and emotionally reserved physicist, Lee drew perfect parallels between polar opposite personalities that co-exist independently yet resentingly. Hulk is now one of the most iconic characters in the modern times and his "Hulk Smash" punchline has become the basis for numerous pop culture memes. (Image: Marvel)
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The Hulk | Lee's storytelling prowess once again came to light with the release of The Incredible Hulk in 1962. With its green-skinned, muscular humanoid possessing immense physical strength whose alter ego, Dr Bruce Banner is a weak, socially withdrawn and emotionally reserved physicist, Lee drew perfect parallels between polar opposite personalities that co-exist independently yet resentingly. Hulk is now one of the most iconic characters in the modern times and his "Hulk Smash" punchline has become the basis for numerous pop culture memes. (Image: Marvel)

Black Panther | Drawing inspiration from 14th-century Mali Empire sultan Mansa Musa and as well as Biblical figures such as Ham and Canaan, Black Panther is the first black superhero in American mainstream comic books. He first appeared in Fantastic Four #52 in 1966 and is the king and protector of the fictional African nation of Wakanda. The depiction of T'Challa's folklore sheds light on Lee's unconventional storytelling as it incorporates ancient rituals with advanced technology in the same realm. (Image: Marvel)
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Black Panther | Drawing inspiration from 14th-century Mali Empire sultan Mansa Musa and as well as Biblical figures such as Ham and Canaan, Black Panther is the first black superhero in American mainstream comic books. He first appeared in Fantastic Four #52 in 1966 and is the king and protector of the fictional African nation of Wakanda. The depiction of T'Challa's folklore sheds light on Lee's unconventional storytelling as it incorporates ancient rituals with advanced technology in the same realm. (Image: Marvel)

Thor | The Asgardian god of thunder first appeared in the Marvel universe in Journey into Mystery #83 in 1962. In an interview, speaking about the genesis of Thor, Lee said, "How do you make someone stronger than the strongest person? It finally came to me: Don't make him human — make him a god." Impressed by the flowing beards, horned helmets, and battle clubs of Norse gods, Lee decided to fictionalise Thor. Apart from comic book success, the character today has sprawled into television series, motions pictures, video games, clothing, toys among others which is the epitome of Lee's creativity and vision. (Image: Marvel)
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Thor | The Asgardian god of thunder first appeared in the Marvel universe in Journey into Mystery #83 in 1962. In an interview, speaking about the genesis of Thor, Lee said, "How do you make someone stronger than the strongest person? It finally came to me: Don't make him human — make him a god." Impressed by the flowing beards, horned helmets, and battle clubs of Norse gods, Lee decided to fictionalise Thor. Apart from comic book success, the character today has sprawled into television series, motions pictures, video games, clothing, toys among others which is the epitome of Lee's creativity and vision. (Image: Marvel)

First Published on Nov 14, 2018 02:11 pm
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