Moneycontrol

Budget 2021

Associate Partners:

  • SMC
  • Samsung
  • Volvo

Moneycontrol

Budget 2021

Associate Partners:

  • SMCSamsungVolvo
Webinar :Join an expert panel for a webinar on Smart investments for a secure retirement January 28, 2021. Register now!

Govt to SC on migrants: Activists 'prophets of doom', draws analogy with 'Vulture and the little girl' photographer

"The Supreme Court should not be allowed to turn into a political platform. From safai karmacharis to the Prime Minister, everyone is working tirelessly," SG Tushar Mehta said

May 28, 2020 / 05:56 PM IST

The government on May 28 slammed activists and called them "prophets of doom" who are spreading "disinformation and negativity" during a Supreme Court hearing on the issue of migrants stranded at places far from their homes.

"There are prophets of doom who keep spreading disinformation, not showing courtesy to the nation. All these people writing on social media, giving interviews don't even acknowledge what is being done," said Solicitor General Tushar Mehta, adding that "armchair intellectuals" to not "recognise the nation's efforts".

The government began running trains and buses to help the migrants get home after criticism of its inaction escalated and tales of hardship were beamed daily by television channels and other media outlets.

At the hearing, Mehta asked whether all those who were criticising had "stepped out of their air-conditioned office". "The Supreme Court should not be allowed to turn into a political platform. From safai karmacharis to the Prime Minister, everyone is working tirelessly," Mehta said.

Mehta drew an analogy with Kevin Carter, the late photographer who captured the famous 'Vulture and the little girl' image. "Photographer Kevin Carter went to Sudan in 1993 during a famine, photographed a vulture waiting for the child to die, (and) he won the Pulitzer, but committed suicide on being asked what happened to the child," Mehta said, according to a CNBC-TV18 report.

Close

COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

View more
How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

View more
Show

"... a journalist had asked him — what happened to the child? He said I don’t know, I had to return home. Then the reporter asked him — how many vultures were there? He said one. The reporter said - no. There were two. One was holding the camera...." Live Law reported Mehta as saying.

In his suicide note, Carter, who died in 1994, said he was "depressed" and was facing financial problems.

The story of Carter is being circulated on WhatsApp, by people sympathetic to the efforts of the government to tackle the migrant issue.

The Supreme Court on May 26 took suo motu cognisance of the "problems and miseries of migrant labourers" stranded across different parts of the country amid the COVID-19 lockdown.

The apex court had issued a notice to the Centre and governments of states and Union Territories (UTs), seeking their response in the matter. It has asked for a list of all the steps taken till date by the Centre in this regard.​
Moneycontrol News
first published: May 28, 2020 05:56 pm

stay updated

Get Daily News on your Browser
Sections