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Coronavirus pandemic | CDC reveals new symptoms for COVID-19 — chills, muscle pain, taste loss, headache

Some telling signs of coronavirus infection that would need immediate medical intervention include breathing trouble, constant pain or pressure in chest, sudden inability to arouse and lips or face turning blue

April 27, 2020 / 05:50 PM IST

The top public health body of the United States – the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) —  has added six more symptoms of the novel coronavirus disease.

As per CDC, chills, constant shivers with chills, sore throat, loss of taste, loss of smell, muscle pain and headache are also among telling symptoms that would suggest if a person has contracted COVID-19. Earlier, they had declared fever, cough and difficulty in breathing as symptoms.

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The deadly disease, that originated in China’s Wuhan, has already infected nearly 30 lakh people across the world and killed more than 2 lakh.

The CDC website mentions that people who have contracted the highly contagious disease are experiencing a host of symptoms, some of which are mild, the others severe. It might take a COVID-19 patient two to 14 days to develop any or all of these symptoms after being exposed to the virus.

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COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

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How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

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Coronavirus pandemic | How does COVID-19 compare to other pandemics, outbreaks?

The US health body also listed some telling signs of coronavirus infection that would need immediate medical intervention. These include constant pain or pressure in the chest, breathing trouble, sudden inability to arouse, and lips or face turning blue.

The CDC also clarified that a running nose or common cold, which may trigger sneezing, are symptoms that are usually not associated with COVID-19. They added if any symptom is severe, consulting a medico would be advisable.

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One must note here, several novel coronavirus cases across the world have reported gastrointestinal issues, including diarrhoea as well. Meanwhile, among younger patients, purple or blue lesions termed as “COVID toes” have been common, reported the Hindustan Times. Among patients in their 30s or 40s, sudden strokes have been triggered by the virus-induced blood clotting.

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