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Apr 16, 2018 01:15 PM IST | Source: Moneycontrol.com

Karnataka Elections 2018: A look at past CMs of the state and their tryst with power

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Both Congress and BJP understand how important the upcoming elections in Karnataka are. For Congress, the ruling party in Karnataka, a win could come as a face saver after its performance in the North East elections. For the BJP, a victory will be another step closer to their vision of ‘Congress-mukt bharat’. Indian political history has taught us how important a candidate is in an election. Modern day political realities also establish this. An Association for Democratic Reforms Survey conducted between December 2017 and February 2018 says that 86% Karnataka voters maintain that the candidate was the most important reason for them to vote in an election. Here’s a brief flashback on all Karnataka CMs in the past 30 years:
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Both Congress and BJP understand how important the upcoming elections in Karnataka are. For Congress, the ruling party in Karnataka, a win could come as a face saver after its performance in the North East elections. For the BJP, a victory will be another step closer to their vision of ‘Congress-mukt bharat’. Indian political history has taught us how important a candidate is in an election. Modern day political realities also establish this. An Association for Democratic Reforms Survey conducted between December 2017 and February 2018 says that 86% Karnataka voters maintain that the candidate was the most important reason for them to vote in an election. Here’s a brief flashback on all Karnataka CMs in the past 30 years:

Bommai (1988-89: 281 days): Dismissal of his government in 1989 without affording him a chance to take a floor test resulted in a landmark Supreme Court judgment. He went on to become the national president of Janata Dal from 1990 to 1996 and briefly, a Union minister in the United Front government.
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Bommai (1988-89: 281 days): Dismissal of his government in 1989 without affording him a chance to take a floor test resulted in a landmark Supreme Court judgment. He went on to become the national president of Janata Dal from 1990 to 1996 and briefly, a Union minister in the United Front government.

Veerendra Patil (1989-90: 314 days): This was Veerendra Patil’s second innings as chief minister, after leading Congress as KPCC chief to a massive victory with a record 181 seats. He had returned to the post after 18 years, serving for the first time during 1968-71. But less than one year into office, fate intervened in the form of massive paralysis, and the then prime minister Rajiv Gandhi infamously dismissed his government, talking to the media at Bangalore airport. (Picture: Karnataka.com )
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Veerendra Patil (1989-90: 314 days): This was Veerendra Patil’s second innings as chief minister, after leading Congress as KPCC chief to a massive victory with a record 181 seats. He had returned to the post after 18 years, serving for the first time during 1968-71. But less than one year into office, fate intervened in the form of massive paralysis, and the then prime minister Rajiv Gandhi infamously dismissed his government, talking to the media at Bangalore airport. (Picture: Karnataka.com )

Veerappa Moily: (1992-94: 2 years, 22 days): During the days of the ‘sealed envelope’ coming from the High Command, Moily pipped the more popular SM Krishna to the post, thanks to his mentor K Karunakaran. After Moily’s term ended, Congress hit its nadir in Karnataka winning only 39 seats. But, thanks to the benevolent party, he later not only became an MP, but a Union minister in UPA government. (Picture: Reuters)
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Veerappa Moily: (1992-94: 2 years, 22 days): During the days of the ‘sealed envelope’ coming from the High Command, Moily pipped the more popular SM Krishna to the post, thanks to his mentor K Karunakaran. After Moily’s term ended, Congress hit its nadir in Karnataka winning only 39 seats. But, thanks to the benevolent party, he later not only became an MP, but a Union minister in UPA government. (Picture: Reuters)

Deve Gowda (1994-96: 1 year, 172 days): When Deve Gowda finally achieved his ambition of becoming chief minister in 1994, he would never have dreamt that something bigger awaited him. Just 17 months later, a campaign spearheaded by Ramakrishna Hegde won 16 Lok Sabha seats for Janata Dal, but destiny beckoned Deve Gowda to become prime minister, though he remained in office only for 11 months. (Picture: Reuters)
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Deve Gowda (1994-96: 1 year, 172 days): When Deve Gowda finally achieved his ambition of becoming chief minister in 1994, he would never have dreamt that something bigger awaited him. Just 17 months later, a campaign spearheaded by Ramakrishna Hegde won 16 Lok Sabha seats for Janata Dal, but destiny beckoned Deve Gowda to become prime minister, though he remained in office only for 11 months. (Picture: Reuters)

JH Patel (1996-99: 3 years, 129 days): A quintessential politician who publicly acknowledged his love for wine and women, he had to weather turbulent times in Janata Dal, after Hegde and Gowda fell apart. His Lingayat credentials helped him to hold on to his chair till the elections in 1999, which he lost, and died a year later. (Picture: Karnataka.com)
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JH Patel (1996-99: 3 years, 129 days): A quintessential politician who publicly acknowledged his love for wine and women, he had to weather turbulent times in Janata Dal, after Hegde and Gowda fell apart. His Lingayat credentials helped him to hold on to his chair till the elections in 1999, which he lost, and died a year later. (Picture: Karnataka.com)

SM Krishna (1999-04: 4 years, 230 days): The Oxford-educated Krishna brought sophistication to administration and also restored investors’ faith in Bengaluru. He would have easily completed a full term, until a little bird told him to go for simultaneous polls with Lok Sabha in 2004, and the Congress party lost miserably. But that did not end his political career. (Picture: Reuters)
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SM Krishna (1999-04: 4 years, 230 days): The Oxford-educated Krishna brought sophistication to administration and also restored investors’ faith in Bengaluru. He would have easily completed a full term, until a little bird told him to go for simultaneous polls with Lok Sabha in 2004, and the Congress party lost miserably. But that did not end his political career. (Picture: Reuters)

Dharam Singh (2004-06: 1 year, 245 days): First chief minister of a coalition government in Karnataka, he tried to provide a good administration amidst all the pinpricks from Deve Gowda, de facto leader of coalition partner JD(S). The amiable Dharam Singh did not lose his smile even when Gowda pulled the rug from under his feet to install Kumaraswamy, his son, as chief minister. (Picture: News18/Getty Images)
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Dharam Singh (2004-06: 1 year, 245 days): First chief minister of a coalition government in Karnataka, he tried to provide a good administration amidst all the pinpricks from Deve Gowda, de facto leader of coalition partner JD(S). The amiable Dharam Singh did not lose his smile even when Gowda pulled the rug from under his feet to install Kumaraswamy, his son, as chief minister. (Picture: News18/Getty Images)

HD Kumaraswamy: 2006-07: 1 year, 253 days): Being the first-time MLA from Ramanagara, Kumaraswamy, during his short stint, showed that politics was very much in his genes when he ran a coalition government with the BJP. But his failure to hand over power to Yeddyurappa at the end of 20 months as per an agreement gave him the tag of a ‘betrayer,’ which he is still struggling to shed.
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HD Kumaraswamy: 2006-07: 1 year, 253 days): Being the first-time MLA from Ramanagara, Kumaraswamy, during his short stint, showed that politics was very much in his genes when he ran a coalition government with the BJP. But his failure to hand over power to Yeddyurappa at the end of 20 months as per an agreement gave him the tag of a ‘betrayer,’ which he is still struggling to shed.

BS Yeddyurappa (2007-11: two terms of 3 years, 69 days in all): Yeddyurappa promised much, but delivered little, as he was embroiled in one controversy after another and he was dogged by dissidents in his own party. BJP’s southern hopes have risen and fallen with BSY, and ironically, even in 2018, the situation remains the same.
10/13

BS Yeddyurappa (2007-11: two terms of 3 years, 69 days in all): Yeddyurappa promised much, but delivered little, as he was embroiled in one controversy after another and he was dogged by dissidents in his own party. BJP’s southern hopes have risen and fallen with BSY, and ironically, even in 2018, the situation remains the same.

DV Sadananda Gowda (2011-12: 343 days): A perfect model for ‘Colgate’ with his permanent smile, Sadananda (which, appropriately, means ‘ever happy’) could barely settle down when he was ousted by internal bickering in the party. But he has won three Lok Sabha terms from three different constituencies and currently is the Union minister for statistics in the Modi government. (Picture: Reuters)
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DV Sadananda Gowda (2011-12: 343 days): A perfect model for ‘Colgate’ with his permanent smile, Sadananda (which, appropriately, means ‘ever happy’) could barely settle down when he was ousted by internal bickering in the party. But he has won three Lok Sabha terms from three different constituencies and currently is the Union minister for statistics in the Modi government. (Picture: Reuters)

Jagadish Shettar (2012-13: 304 days): A former president of BJP, before he could take control of the party or the government, elections were upon him. He saw the BJP’s strength slide from 110 to 40 seats and handed back power to the Congress.
12/13

Jagadish Shettar (2012-13: 304 days): A former president of BJP, before he could take control of the party or the government, elections were upon him. He saw the BJP’s strength slide from 110 to 40 seats and handed back power to the Congress.

Siddaramaiah (May 13, 2013……): A protégé of Ramakrishna Hegde, he later turned to Deve Gowda and turned against Gowda in 2006 when he realised that the Gowda family was merely using him. He campaigned hard and almost single-handedly brought Congress to power in 2013 and became the chief minister. He has taken firm grip of the party; he is looked upon as the master strategist who can win 2018 elections as well. (Picture: News18/Getty Images/Wikimedia Commons)
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Siddaramaiah (May 13, 2013……): A protégé of Ramakrishna Hegde, he later turned to Deve Gowda and turned against Gowda in 2006 when he realised that the Gowda family was merely using him. He campaigned hard and almost single-handedly brought Congress to power in 2013 and became the chief minister. He has taken firm grip of the party; he is looked upon as the master strategist who can win 2018 elections as well. (Picture: News18/Getty Images/Wikimedia Commons)

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