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100 crore vaccination doses claim 'false': Sanjay Raut

Addressing a party meeting at Nashik in Maharashtra on Saturday, Raut said he would give proof that the 100 crore vaccination claim was "false".

October 24, 2021 / 01:00 PM IST
Sanjay Raut (File image: PTI)

Sanjay Raut (File image: PTI)

Shiv Sena MP Sanjay Raut has alleged that the claim of administration of 100 crore vaccine doses against COVID-19 in the country was "false" and not more than 23 crore doses were given to eligible citizens so far.

Addressing a party meeting at Nashik in Maharashtra on Saturday, Raut said he would give proof that the 100 crore vaccination claim was "false".

"How much will you lie?" the Rajya Sabha member asked, without taking any names. "In the last fortnight, 20 Hindus and Sikhs have been killed, 17 to 18 soldiers have been martyred, China is creating problems in Arunachal Pradesh and Ladakh, but we are celebrating 100 crore vaccination, which is not true,” the Shiv Sena’s chief spokesperson claimed.

Who has counted these numbers? he asked. When contacted, Maharashtra BJP spokesman Keshav Upadhye said Shiv Sena leaders are used to making baseless claims.

When contacted, Maharashtra BJP spokesman Keshav Upadhye said Shiv Sena leaders are used to making baseless claims.

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COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

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How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

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"Raut’s comment on 100 crore vaccination, when the figures are clearly seen, is nothing but laughable," he said.

On October 21, India achieved a major milestone in its vaccination programme against COVID-19 as the cumulative vaccine doses administered in the country surpassed the 100-crore mark, resulting in celebratory events in parts of the country.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi had hailed the landmark, reached in little over nine months time since the countrywide vaccination drive was launched on January 16, as a "triumph of Indian science, enterprise and collective spirit of 130 crore".
PTI
first published: Oct 24, 2021 01:04 pm

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