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Last Updated : Sep 26, 2020 02:30 PM IST | Source: AP

A look at how coronavirus has crippled not just human lives but also global economies

The virus changed how people interacted and how they thought about interaction. People isolated to stay healthy — and then worried about what isolation was doing to their health.

Associated Press
As it marched from East to West this year, the coronavirus pandemic sank economies and transformed social interactions. It shut schools and businesses, stopped the sports and entertainment industries dead in their tracks, and even brought low the Olympic Games. And it killed. Nearly 1 million deaths have been recorded worldwide to date, according to data tracked by Johns Hopkins University. The effects were global — but also personal. The virus changed how people socialized and shopped, worked and dressed. It changed how they cared for their loved ones and how they mourned them. (Image: AP)

As it marched from East to West this year, the coronavirus pandemic sank economies and transformed social interactions. It shut schools and businesses, stopped sports and entertainment industries dead in their tracks, and even brought down the Olympic Games. And it killed. Nearly 1 million deaths have been recorded worldwide to date, according to data tracked by Johns Hopkins University. The effects were not only global but also personal. The virus changed how people socialized, shopped, worked and dressed. It changed how they cared for their loved ones and how they mourned them. (Image: AP)

The virus changed how people interacted and how they thought about interaction. People isolated to stay healthy — and then worried about what isolation was doing to their health. Musician Arif Mirbaghi plays double bass at the yard of his house during mandatory self-isolation due to the coronavirus outbreak in Tehran, Iran on April 5. With performance halls closed and many people staying in their homes, Iranian musicians now find performance spaces where they can. (Image: AP)

The virus changed how people interacted and how they thought about interaction. People isolated to stay healthy — and then worried about what isolation was doing to their health. Musician Arif Mirbaghi plays double bass at the yard of his house during mandatory self-isolation due to the coronavirus outbreak in Tehran, Iran on April 5. With performance halls closed and many people staying in their homes, Iranian musicians now find performance spaces wherever they can. (Image: AP)

Graves are decorated with crosses and grass in a section of the Valle de Chalco Municipal Cemetery which opened early in the coronavirus pandemic to accommodate the surge in deaths, on the outskirts of Mexico City, September 22. (Image: AP)

Graves are decorated with crosses and grass in a section of the Valle de Chalco Municipal Cemetery which opened early in the coronavirus pandemic to accommodate the surge in deaths, on the outskirts of Mexico City, September 22. (Image: AP)

Health workers wearing personal protective equipment carry the body of a COVID-19 victim for cremation in Gauhati, India, September 10. (Image: AP)

Health workers wearing personal protective equipment carry the body of a COVID-19 victim for cremation in Gauhati, India, September 10. (Image: AP)

Francisco Espana, 60, looks at the Mediterranean sea from a promenade next to the "Hospital del Mar" in Barcelona, Spain, September 4. Francisco spent 52 days in the Intensive Care unit at the hospital due to coronavirus, but today he was allowed by his doctors to spend almost ten minutes at the seaside as part of his recovery therapy. (Image: AP)

Francisco Espana, 60, looks at the Mediterranean sea from a promenade next to the "Hospital del Mar" in Barcelona, Spain, September 4. Francisco spent 52 days in the Intensive Care unit at the hospital due to coronavirus, but today he was allowed by his doctors to spend almost ten minutes at the seaside as part of his recovery therapy. (Image: AP)

Ruth Morales, 36, center, waits for the arrival of the coffin of her husband, Juan Paucar Quispe, 63, who died from COVID-19 complications, during his burial at a cemetery in Carabayllo, Lima, Peru, August 25. (Image: AP)

Ruth Morales, 36, center, waits for the arrival of the coffin of her husband, Juan Paucar Quispe, 63, who died from COVID-19 complications, during his burial at a cemetery in Carabayllo, Lima, Peru, August 25. (Image: AP)

Fernanda Mariotti cradles a picture of her mother Martha Pedrotti, who passed away a victim of COVID-19, at her home in Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 11. Mariotti believes that her mother eventually died in part from a heart condition and also from the sorrow and fear of being separated from her family, isolated in the COVID unit. (Image: AP)

Fernanda Mariotti cradles a picture of her mother Martha Pedrotti, who passed away a victim of COVID-19, at her home in Buenos Aires, Argentina, August 11. Mariotti believes that her mother eventually died in part from a heart condition and also from the sorrow and fear of being separated from her family, isolated in the COVID unit. (Image: AP)

Romelia Navarro, 64, weeps while hugging her husband, Antonio, in his final moments in a COVID-19 unit at St. Jude Medical Center in Fullerton, Calif., July 31. Antonio was nurse Michel Younkin's first COVID-19 patient to pass on her watch. (Image: AP)

Romelia Navarro, 64, weeps while hugging her husband, Antonio, in his final moments in a COVID-19 unit at St. Jude Medical Center in Fullerton, Calif., July 31. Antonio was nurse Michel Younkin's first COVID-19 patient to pass on her watch. (Image: AP)

Members of the Shiite Imam Ali brigades militia take a break during funerals of coronavirus victims at Wadi al-Salam cemetery near Najaf, Iraq, July 19. A special burial ground near the Wadi al-Salam cemetery has been created specifically for COVID-19 victims since rejections of such burials have continued in Baghdad cemeteries and elsewhere in Iraq. (Image: AP)

Members of the Shiite Imam Ali brigades militia take a break during funerals of coronavirus victims at Wadi al-Salam cemetery near Najaf, Iraq, July 19. A special burial ground near the Wadi al-Salam cemetery has been created specifically for COVID-19 victims since rejections of such burials have continued in Baghdad cemeteries and elsewhere in Iraq. (Image: AP)

Agustina Canamero, 81, and Pascual Perez, 84, hug and kiss through a plastic film screen to avoid contracting the coronavirus at a nursing home in Barcelona, Spain, June 22. (Image: AP)

Agustina Canamero, 81, and Pascual Perez, 84, hug and kiss through a plastic film screen to avoid contracting the coronavirus at a nursing home in Barcelona, Spain, June 22. (Image: AP)

A primary school student reacts sending kisses and a hug from a distance to her teacher, as she collects her personal belongings, during the closing of the school year in a school in Barcelona, Spain, June 16. (Image: AP)

A primary school student reacts sending kisses and a hug from a distance to her teacher, as she collects her personal belongings, during the closing of the school year in a school in Barcelona, Spain, June 16. (Image: AP)

SOS Funeral workers transport by boat the coffin containing the body of a suspected COVID-19 victim that died in a river-side community near Manaus, Brazil on May 14. The victim, an 86-year-old woman, lived by the Negro river, the largest tributary to the Amazon river. (Image: AP)

SOS Funeral workers transport by boat a coffin containing the body of a suspected COVID-19 victim that died in a river-side community near Manaus, Brazil on May 14. The victim, an 86-year-old woman, lived by the Negro river, the largest tributary to the Amazon river. (Image: AP)

Piedrangel funeral home worker Anibal Rosado is reflected in a window of a company van as he prepares to help deliver to relatives, urns that contain the cremated ashes of people who are suspected to have died from the new coronavirus, in Lima, Peru, May 4. Edgard Gonzales, who owns the funeral home with his three brothers, says Piedrangel cremates all COVID-19 victims. (Image: AP)

Piedrangel funeral home worker Anibal Rosado is reflected in a window of a company van as he prepares to help deliver to relatives, urns that contain the cremated ashes of people who are suspected to have died from the new coronavirus, in Lima, Peru, May 4. Edgard Gonzales, who owns the funeral home with his three brothers, says Piedrangel cremates all COVID-19 victims. (Image: AP)

An image of veteran Stephen Kulig is projected onto the home of his daughter, Elizabeth DeForest, as she looks out the window of a spare bedroom as her husband, Kevin, sits downstairs in Chicopee, Mass., May 3. Kulig, a U.S. Navy veteran and resident of the Soldier's Home in Holyoke, Mass., died from the COVID-19 virus at the age of 92. After saying goodbye to her father for the last time in person, Elizabeth slept in the spare bedroom upstairs for two weeks as a precaution against possibly infecting her husband. Seeking to capture moments of private mourning at a time of global isolation, the photographer used a projector to cast large images of veterans on to the homes as their loved ones are struggling to honor them during a lockdown that has sidelined many funeral traditions. (Image: AP)

An image of veteran Stephen Kulig is projected onto the home of his daughter, Elizabeth DeForest, as she looks out the window of a spare bedroom as her husband, Kevin, sits downstairs in Chicopee, Mass., May 3. Kulig, a U.S. Navy veteran and resident of the Soldier's Home in Holyoke, Mass., died from the COVID-19 virus at the age of 92. After saying goodbye to her father for the last time in person, Elizabeth slept in the spare bedroom upstairs for two weeks as a precaution against possibly infecting her husband. Seeking to capture moments of private mourning at a time of global isolation, the photographer used a projector to cast large images of veterans on to the homes as their loved ones are struggling to honor them during a lockdown that has sidelined many funeral traditions. (Image: AP)

Cleric women wearing protective clothing and "chador," a head-to-toe garment, arrive a cemetery to prepare the body of a victim who died from the new coronavirus for a funeral, in the city of Ghaemshahr, in north of Iran, April 30. (Image: AP)

Cleric women wearing protective clothing and "chador," a head-to-toe garment, arrive at a cemetery to prepare the body of a victim who died from the new coronavirus for a funeral, in the city of Ghaemshahr, in north of Iran, April 30. (Image: AP)

The family of Larry Hammond wave as a line of cars with friends and family, who could not attend his funeral because of limits of gatherings of more than 10 people, due to the coronavirus pandemic, pass by their home, in New Orleans, April 22. (Image: AP)

The family of Larry Hammond wave as a line of cars with friends and family, who could not attend his funeral because of limits of gatherings of more than 10 people, due to the coronavirus pandemic, pass by their home, in New Orleans, April 22. (Image: AP)

Coffins carrying the bodies of people who died of coronavirus are stored waiting to be buried or incinerated in an underground parking lot at the Collserola funeral home in Barcelona, Spain, April 2. (Image: AP)

Coffins carrying the bodies of people who died of coronavirus are stored waiting to be buried or incinerated in an underground parking lot at the Collserola funeral home in Barcelona, Spain, April 2. (Image: AP)

Martina Papponetti, 25, a nurse at the Humanitas Gavazzeni Hospital in Bergamo, Italy poses for a portrait at the end of her shift on March 27. Their eyes are tired. Their cheekbones rubbed raw from protective masks. They don't smile. The doctors and nurses on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic in Italy are almost unrecognizable behind their masks, scrubs, gloves and hairnets - the flimsy battle armor donned at the start of each shift as the only barrier to contagion. (Image: AP)

Martina Papponetti, 25, a nurse at the Humanitas Gavazzeni Hospital in Bergamo, Italy poses for a portrait at the end of her shift on March 27. Their eyes are tired. Their cheekbones rubbed raw from protective masks. They don't smile. The doctors and nurses on the front lines of the coronavirus pandemic in Italy are almost unrecognizable behind their masks, scrubs, gloves and hairnets - the flimsy battle armor donned at the start of each shift as the only barrier to contagion. (Image: AP)

First Published on Sep 26, 2020 02:30 pm
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