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COVID-19: Twitter expresses gratitude as doctor shares picture of pruney fingers after using PPE kit

Dr Syed Faizan Ahmad, working in a designated COVID-19 treating centre, took to Twitter to post a picture of his wrinkled fingers, a consequence of wearing the kit for long hours in the humid weather

August 26, 2020 / 05:01 PM IST

When it comes to healthcare workers battling COVID-19, the life-saving personal protective equipment (PPE) kit becomes indispensable as it ensures protection against spread of the infection. However, it has its side-effects too as is shared by this Delhi-based doctor.

Dr Syed Faizan Ahmad, working in a designated COVID-19 treating centre, took to Twitter to post a picture of his wrinkled fingers, a consequence of wearing the kit for long hours in the humid weather.

Along with the picture, the doctor tweeted:

The post soon went viral on the microblogging website, with many expressing their gratitude and respect for the healthcare worker.

Check out a few reactions here:

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COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

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How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

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Moneycontrol News
first published: Aug 26, 2020 05:01 pm

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