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No evidence that vaccines will not work against new COVID variant: Government

"There is no evidence that current vaccines will fail to protect against COVID-19 variants reported from UK or SA. Most vaccines do target the Spike protein, in which there are changes in the variants but vaccines stimulate our immune system to produce a wide range of protective antibodies," Principal Scientific Advisor K Vijay Raghavan said.

December 29, 2020 / 07:13 PM IST
Source: Reuters

Source: Reuters

COVID-19 vaccines will work against new variants of the virus and there is no evidence that current vaccines will fail to protect against the SARS-CoV-2 mutants reported from the UK or South Africa, the government said on Tuesday.

Addressing a press conference, Principal Scientific Advisor K Vijay Raghavan said so far it has not been found that the new variant increases the severity of the disease.

"There is no evidence that current vaccines will fail to protect against COVID-19 variants reported from UK or SA. Most vaccines do target the Spike protein, in which there are changes in the variants but vaccines stimulate our immune system to produce a wide range of protective antibodies," he said.

NITI Aayog member (health) Dr V K Paul said there has been a consistent decline in the number of new COVID-19 cases and deaths which is reassuring given the current scenario across the world.

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COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

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How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

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"We are consistently showing a decline in the number of new COVID-19 cases, active cases and deaths, which is very reassuring. It stands out particularly during this very period when several nations are facing a devastating situation," Paul said.

He said majority of the population is still susceptible to the infection in the cold weather. "The UK variant has travelled to several other countries and also to India, this variant may have its own run and we have to very careful," Paul said.

Giving a break-up on the basis of the gender and age of those infected with the novel coronavirus, Union Health Secretary Rajesh Bhushan said 63 percent of total cases in the country have been reported in males and 37 percent cases in females.

"Eight percent cases have been reported below the age of 17 years, 13 percent in the 18-25 years age group, 39 percent in 26-44 years group, 26 percent in 45-60 years group and 14 percent above 60 years," he said.

Bhushan said 70 percent of COVID deaths have been reported in men and 45 percent fatalities due to this disease have been reported in those below 60 years of age.

He said the number of active cases of COVID-19 has been registered at 2.7 lakhs after six months, and the cumulative positivity rate is at 6.02 percent while the positivity rate during last week was 2.25 percent.

"Five states and UTs which account for 60 percent of total active COVID-19 cases are Maharashtra, Kerala, West Bengal, Uttar Pradesh and Chhattisgarh," he said.

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PTI
first published: Dec 29, 2020 07:13 pm

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