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Nashik man gets 'magnetic powers' taking second dose of COVID-19 vaccine

Arvind Sonar, a resident of Nashik, Maharashtra, has claimed that his body has developed magnetic properties after getting the second dose of COVID vaccine

June 14, 2021 / 01:10 PM IST
Arvind Sonar, a resident of Nashik, Maharashtra, has claimed that his body has developed magnetic properties after getting the second dose of COVID-19 vaccine. (Representative image: AFP)

Arvind Sonar, a resident of Nashik, Maharashtra, has claimed that his body has developed magnetic properties after getting the second dose of COVID-19 vaccine. (Representative image: AFP)

Arvind Sonar, a senior citizen from Nashik's Shivaji Chowk in Maharashtra, has claimed that he developed magnetic powers, a The Times of India reported.

After taking the vaccine doses, metal objects are easily getting stuck on his body, Sonar claimed. The man, to prove his claim, has made a video in which plates, spoons and coins can be seen sticking to his body.

At first, when the items stuck on his body, the family members thought that it may be due to sweat. However, after taking a bath when he tried sticking objects they still stuck to his body.

To probe why the metal objects were getting stuck on his body, the doctors from the Nashik Municipal Corporation visited Sonar.

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COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

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How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

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Doctor Ashok Thorat told TOI that "After investigation only we can come to some conclusion. For now, we will send a report to the government and after that, we will see if any investigation needs to be done. I have seen the video, however, we can't confirm that it has happened after vaccination".

Jayant, Sonar's son, said he had seen a similar video of a person from Delhi who had claimed to have got magnetic powers after taking the second dose of COVID-19 vaccine.
Moneycontrol News
first published: Jun 14, 2021 01:10 pm

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