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IMA to ask Centre to allow door-to-door COVID-19 vaccination

On May 12, the Bombay High Court said if the Union government had started a door-to-door vaccination programme for senior citizens a few months back, then the lives of many of them could have been saved.

May 15, 2021 / 10:56 AM IST
A division bench of Bombay High Court asked the Union government why not pro-actively start this programme when the lives of senior citizens, who are unable to go to vaccination centres to get inoculated, are concerned. (Representative image)

A division bench of Bombay High Court asked the Union government why not pro-actively start this programme when the lives of senior citizens, who are unable to go to vaccination centres to get inoculated, are concerned. (Representative image)

The Indian Medical Association (IMA) has backed the Bombay High Court’s suggestion to start a door-to-door vaccination programme against COVID-19.

The facility of doorstep COVID-19 vaccination would speed up the current pace of inoculations and cover a large number of population in record time, said the national body of medical practitioners in India, reported The Times of India.

The Union government needs to revise its policy now, said the report quoting senior surgeon and IMA national president JA Jayalal.

The IMA will write to the Centre about door-to-door vaccination facility to seek its attention over the issue, said the report. The national body has 3.56 lakh members across the country.

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COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

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How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

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“Our members would wholeheartedly participate in the process as vaccinators or as members of standby medical teams supervising such vaccinations at small medical units, housing society premises and school and college campuses,” Jayalal told the publication.

On May 12, the high court said if the Union government had started a door-to-door vaccination programme for senior citizens a few months back, then the lives of many of them, including prominent persons, could have been saved.

A division bench of Chief Justice Dipankar Datta and Justice GS Kulkarni asked the Union government why not pro-actively start this programme when the lives of senior citizens, who are unable to go to vaccination centres to get inoculated, are concerned.

The bench was hearing a public interest litigation filed by two lawyers Dhruti Kapadia and Kunal Tiwari seeking door-to-door vaccination facility for senior citizens above the age of 75, specially-abled persons and those who are bed-ridden or wheelchair-bound.

Also read | 11 lakh people received jab on May 14, over 18 crore shots administered in India so far

The court reiterated its earlier order of April 22 in which it asked the Union government to relook at its decision to not initiate a door-to-door vaccination programme.

Mass inoculation through door-to-door vaccination will help us achieve herd immunity quickly, said Sanjay Patil, chairman of the IMA’s Hospital Board of India, Pune branch. “We are ready to support the government and district administration as medical experts to achieve this goal,” he added.

(With inputs from PTI)

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Moneycontrol News
first published: May 15, 2021 10:56 am

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