LIVE NOW:Watch the Definedge Conference on Market Analysis (DECMA). Join Now
you are here: HomeNewsIndia

DSGMC opens ‘dawakhana’ at Gurudwara Bangla Sahib, plans for more pharmacies

Medicines will be sold at factory prices which is below their maximum retail price (MRP) and the expenses will be borne by the DSGMC.

August 30, 2020 / 11:44 AM IST
Front view of Gurudwara Bangla Sahib, Delhi (Source: Ken Wieland - Wikicommons)

Front view of Gurudwara Bangla Sahib, Delhi (Source: Ken Wieland - Wikicommons)

The Delhi Sikh Gurudwara Management Committee (DSGMC) on August 29 launched the ‘Bala Pritam Dawakhana’ at the Gurudwara Bangla Sahib in Delhi, in order to provide cheap medicines to the needy.

The DSGMC further plans to open more such “dawakhanas” or pharmacies around the national capital in the coming days, committee president Manjinder Singh Sirsa told ANI. He added that these shops will sell medicines at factory price to those in need.

Sirsa said that medicines will be sold at factory prices which is below their maximum retail price (MRP) and the expenses will be borne by the DSGMC.

Follow our LIVE Updates on the coronavirus pandemic here

“Some medicines are even being sold at 80 percent discount and all kinds of medicines are available. We are opening such shops in all corners of Delhi,” he added.

Close

COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

View more
How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

View more
Show

Total confirmed COVID-19 cases in India have risen to 3,542,733, according to the latest update from the Union Health Ministry. This number includes cases involving foreign nationals, patients who have recovered and the death toll.

As many as 78,761 new COVID-19 cases and 948 deaths were reported in the last 24 hours, thus reported active COVID-19 cases in India now stand at 765,302. As many as 2,713,933 COVID-19 patients have been cured and discharged so far, while the death toll has risen to 63,498.

Follow our full COVID-19 coverage here
Moneycontrol News
first published: Aug 30, 2020 11:44 am

stay updated

Get Daily News on your Browser
Sections