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Delhi HC asks if Gautam Gambhir has license to procure COVID-19 drugs in large quantities

Gautam Gambhir tweeted on April 25 that ‘Fabiflu’ would be available for free

April 28, 2021 / 09:06 AM IST
Gautam Gambhir won the 2019 Lok Sabha Elections from the East Delhi constituency. [Image: Instagram/gautamgambhir55]

Gautam Gambhir won the 2019 Lok Sabha Elections from the East Delhi constituency. [Image: Instagram/gautamgambhir55]


The Delhi High Court, on April 27, asked if BJP MP Gautam Gambhir had the license to procure COVID-19 medicines in large quantities and distribute them. Gambhir won the 2019 Lok Sabha Elections from the East Delhi constituency.

The division bench of Justices Vipin Sanghi and Rekha Palli asked how it was possible for anybody to procure such medicines in large quantities, The Indian Express reported.

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Gambhir is distributing ‘Fabiflu’ as he mentioned on Twitter, said Advocate Rakesh Malhotra earlier.

Malhotra also told the court that even though Gambhir was “doing a good job”, it was an issue since patients of East Delhi were getting the drug while some patients of other areas were not getting it.

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“I do not know from where he is getting it,” Malhotra said.

Also read | 'Kangana of Cricket': MS Dhoni fans attack Gautam Gambhir

Senior advocate Rahul Mehra said it was “highly irresponsible”. Mehra was representing the Delhi government.

“We had thought it would stop after that report. It is still continuing,” said the court.

The former Indian cricketer tweeted on April 25 that ‘Fabiflu’ would be available for free from the following day. People would require their Aadhaar Card and doctor’s prescription to procure the same, he said.

Gambhir tweeted on April 27 that people outside East Delhi were also eligible for getting the COVID-19 medicine for free.

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first published: Apr 28, 2021 09:04 am

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