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COVID-19 second wave | No shortage of oxygen in private or government hospitals in Uttar Pradesh, says CM Yogi Adityanath

The CM added that while oxygen is not in short supply, it is being provided only to the needy, because "every infected patient does not need oxygen, cooperation is expected from the media in increasing awareness about this."

April 25, 2021 / 08:29 AM IST
CM Adityanath also asserted that there is no shortage of drugs like Remdesivir in Uttar Pradesh as a state aircraft was sent to Ahmedabad and the drug was procured directly from the pharma company when the demand increased,

CM Adityanath also asserted that there is no shortage of drugs like Remdesivir in Uttar Pradesh as a state aircraft was sent to Ahmedabad and the drug was procured directly from the pharma company when the demand increased, "Again, even this medicine is not required by all patients," he said. (File Image of UP CM Yogi Adityanath)

Asserting that there is no shortage of oxygen in any private or public COVID hospital in Uttar Pradesh, Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath on Saturday said the state government will conduct an audit of the life-saving gas in collaboration with various institutes.

Urging people not to let their guard down against coronavirus, he said it will be a huge mistake to take it as normal viral fever. Adityanath was speaking during a virtual interaction with editors of different newspapers.

"There is no shortage of oxygen in any COVID hospital, be it private or government. The problem is black marketing and hoarding, which will be tackled with a heavy hand. We are going to conduct an oxygen audit in collaboration with IIT Kanpur, IIM Lucknow and IIT BHU for proper monitoring of oxygen. The system of live tracking of oxygen demand, supply and distribution will be implemented," the chief minister said.

Adityanath also said that oxygen is not in short supply provided only the needy use it.

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COVID-19 Vaccine

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How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

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"Every infected patient does not need oxygen, cooperation is expected from the media in increasing awareness about this," he said.

He acknowledged that there were some initial problems in increasing the number of hospital beds in the state but they were quickly overcome.

Adityanath further said, "It would be a huge mistake to take corona as normal viral fever. I am also in its grip. I have been following all COVID protocols since April 13 while in isolation."

While reviewing the situation in Uttar Pradesh, its large population and demographic diversity should be kept in mind, he said.

The number of infections in this COVID-19 wave is about 30 times more than last time, he added.

Adityanath claimed that the state government's preparation is better than before.

"We have made arrangements for oxygen plants in government institutions. There was a lack of this system in private institutions. Work is on to set up 31 new oxygen plants including 18 plants based on DRDO's latest technology," he said.

The chief minister asserted that there is no shortage of drugs like Remdesivir in Uttar Pradesh.

When the demand increased, a state aircraft was sent to Ahmedabad and the drug was procured directly from the pharma company. Again, even this medicine is not required by all patients, he said.

Adityanath said Uttar Pradesh is the first state to go for 'free vaccination for all'.

Nearly 8,000 centres have been set up where COVID-19 vaccines will be administered free of cost to all people above the age of 18 from May 1, he said.

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