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Coronavirus crisis in Delhi | Only 27 ICU beds left for COVID-19 patients

According to the Delhi government’s dashboard that tracks the COVID-19 Care facilities available in the city, less than one percent ICU beds are available in different government and private facilities.

April 21, 2021 / 02:01 PM IST
The Delhi government said in 2020 when the highest daily number of fresh cases was around 8,000 that the Centre had allocated 4,000 beds for COVID-19 patients in the national capital. [Representative Image: AP]

The Delhi government said in 2020 when the highest daily number of fresh cases was around 8,000 that the Centre had allocated 4,000 beds for COVID-19 patients in the national capital. [Representative Image: AP]

Only 27 out of 4,641 ICU beds are available for COVID-19 patients in Delhi even as the national capital is recording a surge in coronavirus infection.

According to the Delhi government’s dashboard that tracks the COVID-19 care facilities available in the city, less than one percent ICU beds are available in different government and private facilities on April 21 at 12.30 pm.

Of these, 20 beds are available in Madhukar Rainbow Children Hospital in Malviya Nagar, three in All India Institute of Medical Science (AIIMS), and two each in Lady Hardinge Medical College and Sir Ganga Ram City Hospital.

The situation was such a day after the Delhi High Court asked the Central government to look into providing more beds in hospitals run by it in the national capital for COVID-19 patients as people needing hospitalisation now was 'far greater' than last year's peak.

A bench of Justices Vipin Sanghi and Rekha Palli asked the Health Ministry to look into the aspect in view of the prevailing circumstances and file a report on the next date of hearing on April 22.

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A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

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The Delhi government said in 2020 when the highest daily number of fresh cases was around 8,000 that the Centre had allocated 4,000 beds for COVID-19 patients in the national capital. However, in 2021, Delhi has not even received that many beds when the daily count of fresh COVID-19 cases was increasing day by day with the last 24 hours seeing over 28,000 more infections.

Follow our LIVE blog for the latest updates of the novel coronavirus pandemic

A record 28,395 coronavirus cases and 277 deaths marked the aggravation of the pandemic situation in Delhi on April 20 as the positivity rate shot up to 32.82 percent -- meaning every third sample came out positive -- amid a "serious oxygen crisis" unfolding in the city.

Disputing the contention, the Centre said that beds in its hospitals were also required for non-COVID-19 patients who require dialysis or are suffering from serious ailments like cancer. It said that it has operationalised 250 ICU beds at the DRDO COVID Care Hospital here and another 250 beds shall be put in place by April 22.

(With inputs from PTI)

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Moneycontrol News
first published: Apr 21, 2021 01:38 pm

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