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Government cautions against fraud email suggesting to 'pay and register' for COVID-19 vaccine

Cyber Dost – the Twitter handle of the cyber security division of the Ministry of Home Affairs – has cautioned that cybercriminals are now sending out fraud COVID-19 vaccination emails to people, urging them to pay and register to get vaccine shots on 'priority'.

December 29, 2020 / 06:34 PM IST
Several people have reportedly complained of receiving emails that urge them to register for priority or early vaccination during the coronavirus vaccination drive.

Several people have reportedly complained of receiving emails that urge them to register for priority or early vaccination during the coronavirus vaccination drive.


Even before Indians could start getting vaccinated against the novel coronavirus, scamsters have started duping people of their money.

Cyber Dost – the Twitter handle of the cyber security division of the Ministry of Home Affairs – has cautioned that cybercriminals are now sending out fraud COVID-19 vaccination emails to people.

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In a tweet posted on December 28, Cyber Dost warned people from falling for such scams. They cautioned that such messages may be sent via SMS too and people might even get phone calls. They must not divulge any sensitive personal information in such case and report such numbers or mail ids to the police immediately.

Several people have reportedly complained of receiving emails that urge them to register for priority or early vaccination during the coronavirus vaccination drive. The fraud emails urge users to pay a certain sum of money to register themselves for priority vaccination. However, these are just ploys to obtain sensitive information or steal money.

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COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

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How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

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