Upcoming Webinar:'COLLECTIVE FORCE: India Inc. unites to tackle the second wave of COVID-19' on June 23, 11 am. Register Now!
you are here: HomeNewscoronavirus

COVID-19 Update | 6 crore COVID-19 vaccine doses sent to 76 nations, 4.5 crore doses administered in India: Harsh Vardhan

In a major boost to entrepreneurship in life sciences, Vardhan, the Minister for Science and Technology and Earth Sciences, inaugurated IMTECH Bio-Innovation Centre which is an extension of the Atal Incubation Centre (AIC)-CCMB, Hyderabad.

March 21, 2021 / 05:31 PM IST
Union Health Minister Harsh Vardhan (Image: Twitter/@drharshvardhan)

Union Health Minister Harsh Vardhan (Image: Twitter/@drharshvardhan)

More than 6 crore doses of COVID-19 vaccine have been sent to 76 nations, while 4.5 crore doses have been administered to beneficiaries in the country till now, Union Health Minister Harsh Vardhan said on Sunday. He also called for making the vaccination drive a Jan Aandolan (mass movement).

Until this morning, nearly 4.5 crore COVID-19 vaccine doses have been given to the people in this country. More than six crore doses have been sent to 76 nations, Vardhan said during a media interaction at the Institute of Microbial Technology (CSIR-IMTECH) here. Our Prime Minister Narendra Modi and party (BJP) president J P Nadda have called for making the vaccination drive a 'jan andolan' (mass movement)," he said.

AstraZeneca counters Indonesian Muslim concerns over COVID-19 vaccine

In a major boost to entrepreneurship in life sciences, Vardhan, the Minister for Science and Technology and Earth Sciences, inaugurated IMTECH Bio-Innovation Centre which is an extension of the Atal Incubation Centre (AIC)-CCMB, Hyderabad. The aim of the IMTECH Bio-Innovation Centre is to become a hub for life sciences, biotechnology start-ups and MSMEs from all over the country in a short span of time.

Sanjeev Khosla, director, IMTECH apprised the minister about the various activities of the institute and especially the work done by scientists during the COVID-19 pandemic in the last one year. Science has the potential to solve many of our longstanding issues, they may belong to any sector. When I see the science happening in all the labs of CSIR and other places, I feel convinced that it (science) has the potential.

Close

COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

View more
How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

View more
Show

That is why, we have been telling our scientists that we have to have a very people-centric approach and whatever we do in the labs, it should have a connect with the people for the future, Vardhan said. The minister also urged the scientific community to use their experience around coronavirus to be ready for any unforeseen thing like (the disease) which the future may throw up.

I have told the scientific community that they developed a lot of experience during COVID pandemic. They rose to the occasion and helped us in a big way. They should be ready for any unforeseen thing like this (coronavirus) which the future may throw up, he said. Vardhan said the Bio Innovation Centre will help the start-ups as well as MSMEs.

The Narendra Modi government stands rock solid behind anyone who has got a bright idea and wants to convert that idea into an entrepreneurship, discover or develop something new, which can help solve some of the long-standing unresolved problems of the countrymen and maybe alleviate their sufferings and make their lives better. That is what the idea of this Start-up and Stand up' movement is, he said. He said a special fund worth almost over Rs 900 crore was established to help the industry expedite research for COVID-19 vaccine.

Vardhan also inaugurated Centre of Excellence for Intelligent Sensors and System at the Central Scientific Instruments Organisation here, as well as a vaccination help desk at Dadu Majra colony here, an event organised by the city unit of the BJP.
PTI

stay updated

Get Daily News on your Browser
Sections