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COVID-19: Kerala allows schools to reopen from November 1; theatres resume from October 25

Schools are allowed to reopen from classes from 1st to 7th and 10th and 12th will be allowed from November 1 with fully vaccinated teachers and staff.

October 02, 2021 / 09:27 PM IST
(Representative image)

(Representative image)


Kerala government announced revised COVID-19 guidelines for the state, which now allows schools to reopen for Classes from 1st to 7th and 10th and 12th from November 1 with fully vaccinated teachers and staff. Schools in Kerala have remained shut since March last year.

After a high-level COVID-19 evaluation meeting was held on October 2, chaired by Chief Minister Pinarayi Vijayan, an order was released with relaxations of several COVID-19 restrictions.

Along with schools colleges and training institutions are also allowed to hold regular classes from October 18, for all students who have been vaccinated with both doses of the COVID-19 vaccine. Only fully vaccinated teachers/trainers/ staff will be allowed in the colleges and institutes.

Cinemas and auditoriums in Kerala will also reopen on October 25, the Kerala government said, allowing only 50 per cent occupancy. People who are vaccinated with both doses will only be allowed entry to the cinemas.

The staff should also be fully vaccinated, the order read. The meeting also decided that the number of people for marriages and funerals be increased to 50.

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COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

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How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

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Kerala on October 2, logged 13,217 new COVID-19 cases and 121 deaths, taking the caseload to 47,07,936 and the death toll to 25,303. Health minister Veena George said the state has tested 96,835 samples in the last 24 hours and there are 745 wards across 368 local self government bodies where the weekly population infection ratio was above ten per cent.

"There are 1,41,155 active cases in the state of which only 11 per cent are in hospitals," the minister said in a release. Among the districts, Ernakulam reported the highest number of fresh infections on Saturday--1,730, followed by Thiruvananthapuram 1,584 and Thrissur 1,579.

(With inputs from PTI)
Moneycontrol News
first published: Oct 2, 2021 09:27 pm

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