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Last Updated : Nov 21, 2020 03:26 PM IST | Source: PTI

Unilever says its mouthwash will reduce 99.9% coronavirus after rinsing

Unilever however, said, "The tests do not suggest that the formulation is a treatment for COVID-19, nor a guarantee that it will prevent transmission on its own."

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Global FMCG major Unilever on November 21 said it will bring to India its mouthwash formulation, which, it claims, will reduce 99.9 percent of coronavirus after 30 seconds of rinsing.

"Unilever has confirmed that preliminary lab test results show that mouthwash formulation containing CPC Technology reduces 99.9 per cent of SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, after 30 seconds of rinsing," the company said in a statement.

The virus that causes COVID-19 spreads primarily through droplets of saliva or discharge from the nose, which has been detected before, during, and after the acute phase of illness, as well as in asymptomatic cases.

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"Therefore, reducing the viral load in the mouth could help to reduce transmission. The findings indicate that mouthwash could become an important addition to other everyday protective measures like handwashing, physical distancing and mask wearing," it added.

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Also read: Two companies say their COVID-19 vaccines are 95% effective. What does that mean?

Unilever Oral Care Research and Development Head Glyn Roberts said, "While we are clear that this is not a cure or proven way to prevent the transmission of coronavirus, our results are promising."

Roberts added that given the critical stage of the pandemic, the company feels it is important to share the results of the mouthwash.

This technology will be brought to India by Hindustan Unilever Ltd (HUL), Unilever's arm, in Pepsodent Germicheck Mouth Rinse Liquid, which will be launched in India in December 2020, the company said.

Unilever said the test for its mouthwash containing CPC (cetylpyridinium chloride) technology was conducted by an independent and internationally accredited testing facility, Microbac Laboratories, on behalf of Unilever Research Laboratories in the US.

CPC is a widely used cosmetic ingredient, also used by the dental industry, and is known for its antibacterial and anti-virus benefits.

The test focussed on both 30 and 60 seconds rinse times, aiming to replicate the real-life use of mouthwash in an in-vitro context.

The company, however, said, "The tests do not suggest that the formulation is a treatment for COVID-19, nor a guarantee that it will prevent transmission on its own."
First Published on Nov 21, 2020 03:23 pm
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