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No lessons learnt from first wave: UP BJP leader criticises COVID-19 handling

State BJP working committee member Ram Iqbal Singh, who made the remarks on Saturday, is the latest among the party’s own leaders who have questioned the management of the novel coronavirus infection in the state.

June 27, 2021 / 03:56 PM IST

Criticising the handling of the COVID-19 crisis in Uttar Pradesh, a ruling party leader has claimed that at least 10 people died in every village during the second wave as no lessons were learnt from the first one.

State BJP working committee member Ram Iqbal Singh, who made the remarks on Saturday, is the latest among the party’s own leaders who have questioned the management of the novel coronavirus infection in the state.

Speaking to reporters here, Singh rued that the health department did not learn any lessons from the first wave of COVID-19 which led to a large number of deaths due to the disease in the second wave.

“At least 10 people from every village in the state died in the second wave of COVID-19 pandemic,” he alleged.

The BJP leader also demanded that Rs 10 lakh be given to the kin of those who have succumbed to the infection.

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He lamented that after 75 years of freedom, this district with a population of 34 lakh, has no doctors or medicines.

Asked that UP Chief Minister Yogi Adityanath during his visit to Ballia had expressed satisfaction with the arrangements made by the health department, Singh said the officials had misled the CM, and the truth was not shown.

He also urged the BJP government to give diesel subsidy to farmers.

Meanwhile, Ballia BJP MP Virendra Singh Mast claimed that BKU leader Rakesh Tikait was derailing the farmers protest against the Centre’s three new agri-marketing laws.

"Tikait should not have linked the farmers movement with anti-BJP opposition, West Bengal elections, upcoming Uttar Pradesh assembly elections and Article 370,” he told reporters.



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PTI
first published: Jun 27, 2021 03:56 pm
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