Limited Period Offer:Be a PRO for 1 month @Rs49/-Multiple payment options available. Know More
you are here: HomeNewsBusiness

Mumbai may not see COVID-19 vaccination for all above 18 from May 1; this is what BMC commissioner Iqbal Chahal has to say

Around 90 lakh beneficiaries in the city to be vaccinated in the city.

April 27, 2021 / 08:39 AM IST
Representational image

Representational image

Brihanmumbai Municipal Cooperation (BMC) commissioner Iqbal Chahal is set to write to the state govt to postpone vaccination in Mumbai.

As per News18, Chahal said that Mumbai is not prepared to vaccinate on May 1.

The commissioner is said to ask the government for more time as around 270 more vaccination centres are to be created in the city. More time is required to secure a supply for the vaccines, the commissioner said.

Around 90 lakh beneficiaries in the city need to be vaccinated in the city, News18 reported.

Earlier on April 25, Maharashtra minister Aaditya Thackeray said that the state has decided to vaccinate all its citizens free of cost. 

Close

COVID-19 Vaccine

Frequently Asked Questions

View more
How does a vaccine work?

A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

How many types of vaccines are there?

There are broadly four types of vaccine — one, a vaccine based on the whole virus (this could be either inactivated, or an attenuated [weakened] virus vaccine); two, a non-replicating viral vector vaccine that uses a benign virus as vector that carries the antigen of SARS-CoV; three, nucleic-acid vaccines that have genetic material like DNA and RNA of antigens like spike protein given to a person, helping human cells decode genetic material and produce the vaccine; and four, protein subunit vaccine wherein the recombinant proteins of SARS-COV-2 along with an adjuvant (booster) is given as a vaccine.

What does it take to develop a vaccine of this kind?

Vaccine development is a long, complex process. Unlike drugs that are given to people with a diseased, vaccines are given to healthy people and also vulnerable sections such as children, pregnant women and the elderly. So rigorous tests are compulsory. History says that the fastest time it took to develop a vaccine is five years, but it usually takes double or sometimes triple that time.

View more
Show

This was also reiterated by Nawab Malik, another Maharashtra Minister who said that the initiative has already been discussed with the state Cabinet and global tenders for the same will be floated soon.

Maharashtra, India’s richest state, continues to be the worst hit by the coronavirus in the country.  Total active cases in the state are 70,373 as of 6.p.m. on April 26.
first published: Apr 26, 2021 07:37 pm

stay updated

Get Daily News on your Browser
Sections