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COVID-19 | Over 400 Tesla workers tested positive after California plant reopened in May 2020: Report

Tesla was among the first auto companies in the United States who decided to reopen their manufacturing plants in the midst of the coronavirus scare.

March 15, 2021 / 09:38 PM IST
Tesla had drawn criticism after allegedly concealing data related the positive infections among its workers (Image: Reuters)

Tesla had drawn criticism after allegedly concealing data related the positive infections among its workers (Image: Reuters)

Over 400 workers of automobile maker Tesla, working at the company's manufacturing plant in California's Fremont, tested positive for COVID-19 between May and December last year, reports said on March 15 citing data released by a transparency website.

The maximum number of positive cases were reported in December, when 125 workers tested positive, the data released by PlainSite claimed. Cumulatively, 440 workers were infected in the seven-month period, out of over 10,000 workers employed at the factory.

Tesla was among the first auto companies in the United States who decided to reopen their manufacturing plants in the midst of the coronavirus scare.

All production units across the country, and the world at large, were closed between March and May after the World Health Organisation (WHO) had announced the outbreak of a pandemic.

Tesla Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Elon Musk was furious over the restrictions, calling them "fascist". He had even threatened to move the plant out of California if it was not allowed to reopen.

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A vaccine works by mimicking a natural infection. A vaccine not only induces immune response to protect people from any future COVID-19 infection, but also helps quickly build herd immunity to put an end to the pandemic. Herd immunity occurs when a sufficient percentage of a population becomes immune to a disease, making the spread of disease from person to person unlikely. The good news is that SARS-CoV-2 virus has been fairly stable, which increases the viability of a vaccine.

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Musk had even questioned the rationale behind locking down the factories a year ago, claiming that the cases in the United States would be "close to zero".

A year later, the US continues to remain the worst-affected country due to the pandemic, with close to 30 million infections and over 534,000 deaths.

Tesla had drawn criticism after allegedly concealing data related to the health of its workers. According to the New York Times, the company refrained from disclosing the positive cases to prevent the temporary closure of the factory. Other automakers publicly announced when workers had tested positive and halted production to prevent further infection, the report pointed out.
Moneycontrol News
first published: Mar 15, 2021 09:38 pm

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