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PGIM India Credit Risk Fund- Direct Plan - Growth

  • Regular
  • Direct
Category : Credit Risk Fund

Risk Ratios

Ratios calculated on daily returns for last 3 years (Updated as on 29th November, 2019)

  • Standard Deviation

    High volatility
    4.2vs3.11
    Category Avg
  • Sharpe Ratio

    Poor risk adjusted returns
    -0.03vs0.13
    Category Avg

Standard Deviation value gives an idea about how volatile fund returns has been in the past 3 years. Lower value indicates more predictable performance. So if you are comparing 2 funds (lets say Fund A and Fund B) in the same category. If Fund A and Fund B has given 9% returns in last 3 years, but Fund A standard deviation value is lower than Fund B. So you can say that there is a higher chance that Fund A will continue giving similar returns in future also whereas Fund B returns may vary.

Beta value gives idea about how volatile fund performance has been compared to similar funds in the market. Lower beta implies the fund gives more predictable performance compared to similar funds in the market. So if you are comparing 2 funds (lets say Fund A and Fund B) in the same category. If Fund A and Fund B has given 9% returns in last 3 years, but Fund A beta value is lower than Fund B. So you can say that there is a higher chance that Fund A will continue giving similar returns in future also whereas Fund B returns may vary.

Sharpe ratio indicates how much risk was taken to generate the returns. Higher the value means, fund has been able to give better returns for the amount of risk taken. . It is calculated by subtracting the risk-free return, defined as an Indian Government Bond, from the fund’s returns, and then dividing by the standard deviation of returns. For example, if fund A and fund B both have 3-year returns of 15%, and fund A has a Sharpe ratio of 1.40 and fund B has a Sharpe ratio of 1.25, you can chooses fund A, as it has given higher risk-adjusted return.

Treynor’s ratio indicates how much excess return was generated for each unit of risk taken. Higher the value means, fund has been able to give better returns for the amount of risk taken. It is calculated by subtracting the risk-free return, defined as an Indian Government Bond, from the fund’s returns, and then dividing by the beta of returns. For example, if fund A and fund B both have 3-year returns of 15%, and fund A has a Treynor’s ratio of 1.40 and fund B has a Treynor’s ratio of 1.25, then you can chooses fund A, as it has given higher risk-adjusted return.

Alpha indicates how fund generated additional returns compared to a benchmark. . Let’s say if a fund A benchmarks its returns with Nifty50 returns then alpha equal to 1.0 indicates the fund has beaten the nifty returns by 1%, so the higher the alpha, the better.