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Royal Orchid Hotels

BSE: 532699|NSE: ROHLTD|ISIN: INE283H01019|SECTOR: Hotels
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Accounting Policy Year : Mar '18

1 Summary of significant accounting policies

a) Statement of compliance

The standalone financial statements have been prepared in accordance with Indian Accounting Standards (“Ind AS”) notified under the Companies (Indian Accounting Standards) Rules, 2015 and relevant amendment rules issued thereafter. Upto the year ended 31 March 2017, the Company prepared its standalone financial statements in accordance with the requirements of previous GAAP, which includes Standards notified under the section 133 of the Companies Act, 2013 and the relevant provisions of Companies Act, 2013 (“the Act”), as applicable. These are the Company’s first Ind AS standalone financial statements. The date of transition to Ind AS is 1 April 2016. Refer Note 47 on first-time adoption exemptions/exceptions availed by the Company.

b) Basis of preparation and presentation

The standalone financial statements have been prepared on the historical cost basis except for certain financial instruments that are measured at fair values at the end of each reporting period, as explained in the accounting policies below.

Historical cost is generally based on the fair value of the consideration given in exchange for services.

Fair value is the price that would be received to sell an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date, regardless of whether that price is directly observable or estimated using another valuation technique. In estimating the fair value of an asset or a liability, the Company takes into account the characteristics of the asset or liability if market participants would take those characteristics into account when pricing the asset or liability at the measurement date. Fair value for measurement and/or disclosure purposes in these standalone financial statements is determined on such a basis, except for leasing transactions that are within the scope of Ind AS 17, and measurements that have some similarities to fair value but are not fair valued, such as value in use quantification as per Ind AS 36.

In addition, for financial reporting purposes, fair value measurements are categorised into Level 1, 2, or 3 based on the degree to which the inputs to the fair value measurements are observable and the significance of the inputs to the fair value measurement in its entirety, which are described as follows:

Level 1 inputs are quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the entity can access at the measurement date;

Level 2 inputs are inputs, other than quoted prices included within Level 1, that are observable for the asset or liability, either directly or indirectly; and

Level 3 inputs are unobservable inputs for the asset or liability.

c) Use of estimates

The preparation of the standalone financial statements in conformity with the recognition and measurement principles of Ind AS requires the Management to make estimates and assumptions considered in the reported amounts of assets and liabilities and disclosure relating to contingent liabilities as at the date of standalone financial statements and the reported amounts of income and expenditure during the reported year. The Management believes that the estimates used in preparation of the standalone financial statements are prudent and reasonable. Future results could differ due to these estimates and the differences between the actual results and the estimates are recognised in the periods in which the results are known / materialise. In particular, information about significant areas of estimation, uncertainty and critical judgments in applying accounting policies that have the most significant effect on the amounts recognized in the financial statements pertain to:

Useful lives of property, plant and equipment

The Company reviews the useful life of property, plant and equipment at the end of each reporting period. This reassessment may result in change in depreciation expense in future periods.

Impairment of investments

The Company reviews its carrying value of investments carried at cost or amortised cost annually, or more frequently when there is indication for impairment. If the recoverable amount is less than its carrying amount, the impairment loss is accounted for.

Litigation

From time to time, the Company is subject to legal proceedings the ultimate outcome of each being always subject to many uncertainties inherent in litigation. A provision for litigation is made when it is considered probable that a payment will be made and the amount of the loss can be reasonably estimated. Significant judgement is made when evaluating, among other factors, the probability of unfavourable outcome and the ability to make a reasonable estimate of the amount of potential loss. Litigation provisions are reviewed at each accounting period and revisions made for the changes in facts and circumstances.

Income taxes

Deferred tax assets are recognized to the extent that it is regarded as probable that deductible temporary differences can be realized. The Company estimates deferred tax assets and liabilities based on current tax laws and rates and in certain cases, business plans, including management’s expectations regarding the manner and timing of recovery of the related assets. Changes in these estimates may affect the amount of deferred tax liabilities or the valuation of deferred tax assets and thereby the tax charge in the Statement of Profit or Loss. Provision for tax liabilities require judgements on the interpretation of tax legislation, developments in case law and the potential outcomes of tax audits and appeals which may be subject to significant uncertainty. Therefore the actual results may vary from expectations resulting in adjustments to provisions, the valuation of deferred tax assets, cash tax settlements and therefore the tax charge in the Statement of Profit or Loss.

Defined benefit plans

The cost of the defined benefit plans and the present value of the defined benefit obligation are based on actuarial valuation using the projected unit credit method. An actuarial valuation involves making various assumptions that may differ from actual developments in the future. These include the determination of the discount rate, future salary increases and mortality rates. Due to the complexities involved in the valuation and its long term nature, a defined benefit obligation is highly sensitive to changes in these assumptions. All assumptions are reviewed at each Balance Sheet date.

d) Revenue recognition

Revenue from contracts with customers is recognized to the extent that it is probable that the economic benefits will flow to the Company and the revenue can be reliably measured, regardless of when the payment is being made. Revenue is measured at the fair value of the consideration received or receivable, taking into account contractually defined terms of payment and excluding taxes or duties collected on behalf of the government.

The specific recognition criteria described below must also be met before revenue is recognized.

Income from operations

Revenues comprise income from the sale of room nights, food and beverages and allied services during a guest’s stay at the hotel. Room revenue is recognised based on occupation and revenue from sale of food, beverages and other allied services, as the respective services are rendered with reasonable certainty of ultimate collection. Other revenues are recognised as and when the services are performed or the right to receive claim is established, with reasonable certainty for ultimate collection. Rebates and discounts granted to customers are reduced from revenue.

Income from management and technical services are recognised as the services are rendered based on the terms of the contract. Unbilled revenues’ represent revenues recognised on services rendered, for which amounts are to be billed in subsequent periods. Interest income

Interest income is reported on an accrual basis using the effective interest method and is included under the head “other income” in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

Dividend

Dividend income is recognized when the Company’s right to receive the amount is established.

e) Employee benefits

Employee benefits include provident fund, employee state insurance scheme, labour welfare fund, gratuity and compensated absences. Expenses and liabilities in respect of employee benefits are recorded in accordance with Ind AS 19, Employee Benefits.

Defined contribution plan

Retirement benefit in the form of provident fund and employee state insurance scheme is a defined contribution scheme. The Company is generally liable for specified contributions to a separate entity and has no obligation to pay any further amounts. The Company’s contribution is recognized as an expense in the statement of profit and loss during the period in which the employee renders the related service.

Defined benefit plan Gratuity

The liability recognised in the balance sheet in respect of defined benefit gratuity plans is the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the end of the reporting period. The cost of providing benefits under the defined benefit plan is determined using the projected unit credit method.

Compensated absences

Compensated absences which are not expected to occur within twelve months after the end of the period in which the employee renders the related services are recognised as an actuarially determined liability at the present value of the defined benefit obligation at the Balance Sheet date.

Service cost on the Company’s defined benefit plan is included in employee benefits expense. Employee contributions, all of which are independent of the number of years of service, are treated as a reduction of service cost. Gains and losses through re-measurements of the defined benefit plans are recognized in other comprehensive income, which are not reclassified to profit or loss in a subsequent period. Further, as required under Ind AS compliant Schedule III, the Company transfers those amounts recognized in other comprehensive income to retained earnings in the statement of changes in equity and in the balance sheet.

Short-term employee benefits

The costs of all short-term employee benefits (that are expected to be settled wholly within 12 months after the end of the period in which the employees render the related service) are recognised during the period in which the employee renders the related services. The accruals for employee entitlements of benefits such as salaries, bonuses and annual leave represent the amount which the Company has a present obligation to pay as a result of the employees’ services and the obligation can be measured reliably. The accruals have been calculated at undiscounted amounts based on current salary levels at the Balance Sheet date.

f) Property, plant and equipment

Property, plant and equipment are stated at cost, less accumulated depreciation (other than freehold land) and impairment losses, if any.

All property, plant and equipment are initially recorded at cost. Cost includes the acquisition cost or the cost of construction, including duties and non-refundable taxes, expenses directly related to bringing the asset to the location and condition necessary for making them operational for their intended use and, in the case of qualifying assets, the attributable borrowing costs. Initial estimate of costs of dismantling and removing the item and restoring the site on which it is located is also included if there is an obligation to restore it.

Subsequent expenditure relating to property, plant and equipment is capitalised only when it is probable that future economic benefits associated with these will flow to the Company and the cost of the item can be measured reliably. An asset’s carrying amount is written down immediately to its recoverable amount if the asset’s carrying amount is greater than its estimated recoverable amount.

Depreciation is charged to Statement of Profit and Loss so as to expense the cost of assets (other than freehold land and properties under construction) less their residual values over their useful lives, using the straight line method, as per the useful life prescribed in Schedule II to the Companies Act, 2013.

Leasehold building (including improvements) is amortised on a straight-line basis over the period of the lease.

The Company has evaluated the applicability of component accounting as prescribed under Ind AS 16 and Schedule II of the Companies Act, 2013, the management has not identified any significant component having different useful lives.

Depreciation methods, useful lives and residual values are reviewed periodically and updated as required, including at each financial year end.

The Company has elected to continue with the carrying value for all of its property, plant and equipment as recognized in its Previous GAAP financial statements as deemed cost at the transition date, viz., 1 April 2016.

Capital work in progress represents projects under which the property, plant and equipment are not yet ready for their intended use and are carried at cost determined as aforesaid.

g) Intangible assets

Intangible assets include cost of acquired software. Intangible assets are initially measured at acquisition cost including directly attributable costs of preparing the asset for its intended use. Intangible assets are amortised over a period of three years.

For transition to Ind AS, the Company has elected to continue with carrying value of all of its intangible assets recognized as of 1 April 2016 (transition date) measured as per the previous GAAP and use that carrying value as its deemed cost as of the transition date.

h) Impairment of assets

Assets that are subject to amortisation are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. An impairment loss is recognised for the amount by which the asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount.

Recoverable amount is the higher of fair value less costs of disposal and value in use. In assessing value in use, the estimated future cash flows are discounted to their present value using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset for which the estimates of future cash flows have not been adjusted. If the recoverable amount of an asset (or cash-generating unit) is estimated to be less than its carrying amount, the carrying amount of the asset (or cash-generating unit) is reduced to its recoverable amount. An impairment loss is recognized immediately in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

When an impairment loss subsequently reverses, the carrying amount of the asset (or a cash-generating unit) is increased to the revised estimate of its recoverable amount, but so that the increased carrying amount does not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined had no impairment loss been recognized for the asset (or cash-generating unit) in prior years. A reversal of an impairment loss is recognized immediately in Statement of Profit and Loss.

i) Foreign currency translations

The functional currency of the Company is Indian rupee (‘).

Initial Recognition

On initial recognition, all foreign currency transactions are recorded by applying to the foreign currency amount the exchange rate between the reporting currency and the foreign currency at the date of the transaction.

Subsequent Recognition

As at the reporting date, non-monetary items which are carried at historical cost and denominated in a foreign currency are reported using the exchange rate at the date of the transaction. All non-monetary items which are carried at fair value denominated in a foreign currency are retranslated at the rates prevailing at the date when the fair value was determined.

Income and expenses in foreign currencies are recorded at exchange rates prevailing on the date of the transaction. Foreign currency denominated monetary assets and liabilities are translated at the exchange rate prevailing on the balance sheet date and exchange gains and losses arising on settlement and restatement are recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

j) Assets taken on lease:

Operating Lease

A Lease in which a significant portion of the risks and rewards of ownership are not transferred to the Company is classified as operating lease. Payments made under operating lease are charged to the Statement of Profit and Loss on a straight-line basis over the period of the lease unless the payments are structured to increase in line with the expected general inflation to compensate for the lessor’s expected inflationary cost increases.

For leases which include both land and building elements, basis of classification of each element is assessed on the date of transition, 1 April 2016, in accordance with Ind AS 101 First-time Adoption of Indian Accounting Standard.

k) Inventories

Inventory comprises food, beverages, stores and spare parts and are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value. Cost includes cost of purchase and other costs incurred in bringing the goods to their present location and condition and is determined on a weighted average basis. Net realisable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of business, less estimated costs of completion to make the sale.

l) Government grants

The Company may receive government grants that require compliance with certain conditions related to the Company’s operating activities or are provided to the Company by way of financial assistance on the basis of certain qualifying criteria.

Government grants are recognised when there is reasonable assurance that the grant will be received, and the Company will comply with the conditions attached to the grant. Accordingly, government grants:

(a) related to or used for assets are included in the Balance Sheet as deferred income and recognised as income over the period in which the associated obligations are fulfilled.

(b) related to incurring specific expenditures are taken to the Statement of Profit and Loss on the same basis and in the same periods as the expenditures incurred.

(c) by way of financial assistance on the basis of certain qualifying criteria are recognised as they become receivable.

m) Income taxes

Income tax expense comprises current tax expense and the net change in the deferred tax asset or liability during the year. Current and deferred tax are recognised in statement of profit and loss, except when they relate to items that are recognised in other comprehensive income or directly in equity, in which case, the current and deferred tax are also recognised in other comprehensive income or directly in equity, respectively.

i) Current tax:

Current tax expenses are accounted in the same period to which the revenue and expenses relate. Provision for current income tax is made for the tax liability payable on taxable income after considering tax allowances, deductions and exemptions determined in accordance with the applicable tax rates and the prevailing tax laws. Current tax assets and current tax liabilities are offset when there is a legally enforceable right to set off the recognised amounts and there is an intention to settle the asset and the liability on a net basis.

(ii) Deferred tax :

Deferred income tax is recognised using the balance sheet approach. Deferred income tax assets and liabilities are recognised for deductible and taxable temporary differences arising between the tax base of assets and liabilities and their carrying amount in financial statements, except when the deferred income tax arises from the initial recognition of goodwill, an asset or liability in a transaction that is not a business combination and affects neither accounting nor taxable profits or loss at the time of the transaction.

Deferred income tax assets are recognised to the extent that it is probable that taxable profit will be available against which the deductible temporary differences and the carry forward of unused tax credits and unused tax losses can be utilised. Deferred tax liabilities are generally recognized for all taxable temporary differences except in respect of taxable temporary differences associated with investments in subsidiaries, associates and interests in joint ventures where the timing of the reversal of the temporary difference can be controlled and it is probable that the temporary difference will not reverse in the foreseeable future

The carrying amount of deferred tax assets is reviewed at each Balance Sheet date and reduced to the extent that it is no longer probable that sufficient taxable profits will be available to allow all or part of the deferred income tax asset to be utilised.

Deferred tax liabilities and assets are measured at tax rates that are expected to apply in the period in which the liability is settled or the asset realised, based on tax rates (and tax laws) that have been enacted or substantially enacted by the end of the reporting period. Deferred tax relating to items recognised outside profit or loss is recognised outside profit or loss (either in other comprehensive income or in equity). Deferred tax items are recognised in correlation to the underlying transaction either in OCI or directly in equity.

Minimum Alternative Tax (“MAT”) credit forming part of Deferred tax assets is recognized as an asset only when and to the extent there is reasonable certainty that the Company will pay normal income tax during the specified period. Such asset is reviewed at each Balance Sheet date and the carrying amount of the MAT credit asset is written down to the extent there is no longer a reasonable certainty to the effect that the Company will pay normal income tax during the specified period.

n) Borrowing costs

Borrowing costs directly attributable to the acquisition, construction or production of an asset that necessarily takes a substantial period of time to get ready for its intended use or sale are capitalised as part of the cost of the asset. All other borrowing costs are expensed in the period in which they occur. Borrowing costs consist of interest and other costs that an entity incurs in connection with the borrowing of funds.

o) Provisions and contingencies Provisions

A provision is recognised if, as a result of a past event, the Company has a present legal or constructive obligation that is reasonably estimable, and it is probable that an outflow of economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation. If the effect of the time value of money is material, provisions are determined by discounting the expected future cash flows at a pre-tax rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the liability. The increase in the provision due to the passage of time is recognised as interest expense.

Contingent liabilities

A contingent liability is a possible obligation that arises from past events whose existence will be confirmed by the occurrence or nonoccurrence of one or more uncertain future events not wholly within the control of the Company or a present obligation that is not recognised because it is not probable that an outflow of resources will be required to settle the obligation or it cannot be measured with sufficient reliability. The Company does not recognise a contingent liability but discloses its existence in the financial statements. Contingent assets

Contingent assets are neither recognised nor disclosed. However, when realisation of income is virtually certain, related asset is recognised.

p) Statement of Cash Flows

Cash flows are reported using the indirect method, whereby profit/ (loss) before tax is adjusted for the effects of transactions of non cash nature and any deferrals or accruals of past or future cash receipts or payments. Cash flow for the year are classified by operating, investing and financing activities.

q) Earnings Per Share

Basic earnings per share is computed by dividing the profit or loss after tax by the weighted average number of equity shares outstanding during the year including potential equity shares on compulsory convertible debentures. Diluted earnings per share is computed by dividing the profit / (loss) after tax as adjusted for dividend, interest and other charges to expense or income (net of any attributable taxes) relating to the dilutive potential equity shares, by the weighted average number of equity shares considered for deriving basic earnings per share.

r) Exceptional items

The Company discloses certain financial information both including and excluding exceptional items. The presentation of information excluding exceptional items allows a better understanding of the underlying trading performance of the company and provides consistency with the company’s internal management reporting. Exceptional items are identified by virtue of either their size or nature so as to facilitate comparison with prior periods and to assess underlying trends in the financial performance of the company. Exceptional items can include, but are not restricted to, gains and losses on the disposal of assets/ investments / operations, impairment charges, exchange gain/ loss on long term borrowings/ assets and changes in fair value of derivative contracts.

s) Share based payments

The Company has equity-settled share-based remuneration plans for its employees. None of the Company’s plans are cash-settled. Where employees are rewarded using share-based payments, the fair value of employees’ services is determined indirectly by reference to the fair value of the equity instruments granted. This fair value is appraised at the grant date and excludes the impact of non-market vesting conditions (for example profitability and sales growth targets and performance conditions).

All share-based remuneration is ultimately recognised as an expense in profit or loss with a corresponding credit to equity. If vesting periods or other vesting conditions apply, the expense is allocated over the vesting period, based on the best available estimate of the number of share options expected to vest. Upon exercise of share options, the proceeds received, net of any directly attributable transaction costs, are allocated to share capital up to the nominal (or par) value of the shares issued with any excess being recorded as share premium.

t) Segment reporting

Operating segments are reported in a manner consistent with the internal reporting provided to the chief operating decision maker. The Company is engaged in the business of operating and managing hotels/ resorts and providing related services, which constitutes its single reportable segment.

u) Financial instruments

(i) Financial assets

Initial recognition and measurement

Financial assets are recognised when, and only when, the Company becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the financial instrument. The Company determines the classification of its financial assets at initial recognition. When financial assets are recognised initially, they are measured at fair value, plus, in the case of financial assets not at fair value through profit or loss directly attributable transaction costs. Transaction costs of financial assets carried at fair value through profit or loss are expensed in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

Classification

- Cash and Cash Equivalents - Cash comprises cash on hand and demand deposits with banks. Cash equivalents are short-term balances (with an original maturity of three months or less from the date of acquisition), highly liquid investments that are readily convertible into known amounts of cash and which are subject to insignificant risk of changes in value.

- Debt Instruments - The Company classifies its debt instruments as subsequently measured at amortised cost, fair value through Other Comprehensive Income or fair value through profit or loss based on its business model for managing the financial assets and the contractual cash flow characteristics of the financial asset.

(a) Financial assets at amortised cost -

Financial assets are subsequently measured at amortised cost if these financial assets are held for collection of contractual cash flows where those cash flows represent solely payments of principal and interest. Interest income from these financial assets is included as a part of the Company’s income in the Statement of Profit and Loss using the effective interest rate method.

(b) Financial assets at fair value through Other Comprehensive Income (FVOCI) -

Financial assets are subsequently measured at fair value through Other Comprehensive Income if these financial assets are held for collection of contractual cash flows and for selling the financial assets, where the assets’ cash flows represent solely payments of principal and interest. Movements in the carrying value are taken through Other Comprehensive Income, except for the recognition of impairment gains or losses, interest revenue and foreign exchange gains or losses which are recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss. When the financial asset is derecognised, the cumulative gain or loss previously recognised in Other Comprehensive Income is reclassified from Other Comprehensive Income to the Statement of Profit and Loss. Interest income on such financial assets is included as a part of the Company’s income in the Statement of Profit and Loss using the effective interest rate method.

(c) Financial assets at fair value through profit or loss (FVTPL) -

Assets that do not meet the criteria for amortised cost or FVOCI are measured at fair value through profit or loss. A gain or loss on such debt instrument that is subsequently measured at FVTPL and is not part of a hedging relationship as well as interest income is recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

- Equity Instruments - The Company subsequently measures all equity investments (other than the investment in subsidiaries, joint ventures and associates which are measured at cost) at fair value. Where the Company has elected to present fair value gains and losses on equity investments in Other Comprehensive Income (“FVOCI”), there is no subsequent reclassification of fair value gains and losses to profit or loss. Dividends from such investments are recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss as other income when the Company’s right to receive payment is established.

At the date of transition to Ind AS, the Company has made an irrevocable election to present in Other Comprehensive Income subsequent changes in the fair value of equity investments that are not held for trading.

When the equity investment is derecognised, the cumulative gain or loss previously recognised in Other Comprehensive Income is reclassified from Other Comprehensive Income to the Retained Earnings directly.

De-recognition

A financial asset is derecognised only when the Company has transferred the rights to receive cash flows from the financial asset. Where the Company has transferred an asset, the Company evaluates whether it has transferred substantially all risks and rewards of ownership of the financial asset. In such cases, the financial asset is derecognised.

Where the Company has not transferred substantially all risks and rewards of ownership of the financial asset, the financial asset is not derecognised. Where the Company retains control of the financial asset, the asset is continued to be recognised to the extent of continuing involvement in the financial asset.

(ii) Financial liabilities

Initial recognition and measurement

Financial liabilities are recognised when, and only when, the Company becomes a party to the contractual provisions of the financial instrument. The Company determines the classification of its financial liabilities at initial recognition. All financial liabilities are recognised initially at fair value, plus, in the case of financial liabilities not at fair value through profit or loss directly attributable transaction costs.

Subsequent measurement

After initial recognition, financial liabilities that are not carried at fair value through profit or loss are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method. Gains and losses are recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss when the liabilities are derecognised, and through the amortisation process.

De-recognition

A financial liability is de-recognised when the obligation under the liability is discharged or cancelled or expires. When an existing financial liability is replaced by another from the same lender on substantially different terms, or the terms of an existing liability are substantially modified, such an exchange or modification is treated as a de-recognition of the original liability and the recognition of a new liability, and the difference in the respective carrying amounts is recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

Derivatives

Derivatives are initially recognised at fair value on the date a derivative contract is entered into and are subsequently re-measured to their fair value at the end of each reporting period. The accounting for subsequent changes in fair value depends on whether the derivative is designated as a hedging instrument, and if so, the nature of the item being hedged and the type of hedge relationship designated. During the years reported, no hedge relationship was designated.

Equity instruments

An equity instrument is any contract that evidences a residual interest in the assets of an entity after deducting all of its liabilities. Equity instruments issued by the Company are recognised at the proceeds received, net of direct issue costs. Repurchase of the Company’s own equity instruments is recognised and deducted directly in equity. No gain or loss is recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss on the purchase, sale, issue or cancellation of the Company’s own equity instruments.

(iii) Impairment of financial assets

The Company assesses, at each reporting date, whether a financial asset or a group of financial assets is impaired. Ind AS-109 on Financial Instruments, requires expected credit losses to be measured through a loss allowance. For trade receivables only, the Company recognises expected lifetime losses using the simplified approach permitted by Ind AS-109, from initial recognition of the receivables. For other financial assets (not being equity instruments or debt instruments measured subsequently at FVTPL) the expected credit losses are measured at the 12 month expected credit losses or an amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses if there has been a significant increase in credit risk since initial recognition.

v) Standards issued but not yet effective

Appendix B to Ind AS 21, Foreign currency transactions and advance consideration:

On 28 March 2018, Ministry of Corporate Affairs (“MCA”) has notified the Companies ( Indian Accounting Standards) Amendment Rules, 2018 containing Appendix B to Ind AS 21, Foreign currency transactions and advance consideration which clarifies the date of the transaction for the purpose of determining the exchange rate to use on initial recognition of the related asset, expense or income, when an entity has received or paid advance consideration in a foreign currency. The amendment will come into force from 1 April 2018. The Company is in process of evaluating the effect of this on the standalone financial statements and expects the impact to be not material.

Ind AS 115- Revenue from Contract with Customers:

On 28 March 2018, Ministry of Corporate Affairs (“MCA”) has notified the Ind AS 115, Revenue from Contract with Customers. The core principle of the new standard is that an entity should recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the entity expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. Further the new standard requires enhanced disclosures about the nature, amount, timing and uncertainty of revenue and cash flows arising from the entity’s contracts with customers.

The standard permits two possible methods of transition:

a. Retrospective approach - Under this approach the standard will be applied retrospectively to each prior reporting period presented in accordance with Ind AS 8 - Accounting Policies, Changes in Accounting Estimates and Errors.

b. Retrospectively with cumulative effect of initially applying the standard recognized at the date of initial application (Cumulative catch-up approach)

The effective date for adoption of Ind AS 115 is financial periods beginning on or after 1 April 2018. The Company has completed an initial qualitative assessment of the potential impact of the adoption of Ind AS 115 on accounting policies followed in its standalone financial statements. The quantitative impact of adoption of Ind AS 115 on the standalone financial statements in the period of initial application is not expected to be material.

Source : Dion Global Solutions Limited
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