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Bajaj Finance

BSE: 500034|NSE: BAJFINANCE|ISIN: INE296A01024|SECTOR: Finance - Leasing & Hire Purchase
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Accounting Policy Year : Mar '19

This note provides a list of the significant accounting policies adopted in the preparation of these financial statements.

These policies have been consistently applied to all the years presented, unless otherwise stated.

1.1 Income

(i) Interest income

The Company recognises interest income using Effective Interest Rate (EIR) on all financial assets subsequently measured at amortised cost or fair value through other comprehensive income (FVOCI). EIR is calculated by considering all costs and incomes attributable to acquisition of a financial asset or assumption of a financial liability and it represents a rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments/receipts through the expected life of the financial asset/financial liability to the gross carrying amount of a financial asset or to the amortised cost of a financial liability.

The Company recognises interest income by applying the EIR to the gross carrying amount of financial assets other than credit-impaired assets. In case of credit-impaired financial assets [as set out in note no. 3.4(i)] regarded as ‘stage 3’, the Company recognises interest income on the amortised cost net of impairment loss of the financial asset at EIR. If the financial asset is no longer credit-impaired [as outlined in note no. 3.4(i)], the Company reverts to calculating interest income on a gross basis.

Delayed payment interest (penal interest) levied on customers for delay in repayments/non payment of contractual cashflows is recognised on realisation.

Interest on financial assets subsequently measured at fair value through profit or loss (FVTPL) is recognised at the contractual rate of interest.

(ii) Dividend income

Dividend income on equity shares is recognised when the Company’s right to receive the payment is established, which is generally when shareholders approve the dividend.

(iii) Other revenue from operations

The Company recognises revenue from contracts with customers (other than financial assets to which Ind AS 109 ‘Financial Instruments’ is applicable) based on a comprehensive assessment model as set out in Ind AS 115 ‘Revenue from contracts with customers’. The Company identifies contract(s) with a customer and its performance obligations under the contract, determines the transaction price and its allocation to the performance obligations in the contract and recognises revenue only on satisfactory completion of performance obligations. Revenue is measured at fair value of the consideration received or receivable.

(a) Fees and commission

The Company recognises service and administration charges towards rendering of additional services to its loan customers on satisfactory completion of service delivery.

Fees on value added services and products are recognised on rendering of services and products to the customer.

Distribution income is earned by selling of services and products of other entities under distribution arrangements. The income so earned is recognised on successful sales on behalf of other entities subject to

there being no significant uncertainty of its recovery.

Foreclosure charges are collected from loan customers for early payment/closure of loan and are recognised on realisation.

(b) Net gain on fair value changes

Financial assets are subsequently measured at fair value through profit or loss (FVTPL) or fair value through other comprehensive income (FVOCI), as applicable. The Company recognises gains/losses on fair value change of financial assets measured as FVTPL and realised gains/losses on derecognition of financial asset measured at FVTPL and FVOCI.

(c) Sale of services

The Company, on de-recognition of financial assets where a right to service the derecognised financial assets for a fee is retained, recognises the fair value of future service fee income over service obligations cost on net basis as service fee income in the statement of profit or loss and, correspondingly creates a service asset in Balance Sheet. Any subsequent increase in the fair value of service assets is recognised as service income and any decrease is recognised as an expense in the period in which it occurs. The embedded interest component in the service asset is recognised as interest income in line with Ind AS 109 ‘Financial instruments’.

Other revenues on sale of services are recognised as per Ind AS 115 ‘Revenue From Contracts with Customers’ as articulated above in ‘other revenue from operations’.

(d) Recoveries of financial assets written off

The Company recognises income on recoveries of financial assets written off on realisation or when the right to receive the same without any uncertainties of recovery is established.

(iv) Taxes

Incomes are recognised net of the Goods and Services Tax/Service Tax, wherever applicable.

1.2 Expenditures

(i) Finance costs

Borrowing costs on financial liabilities are recognised using the EIR [refer note no. 3.1(i)].

(ii) Fees and commission expenses

Fees and commission expenses which are not directly linked to the sourcing of financial assets, such as commission/incentive incurred on value added services and products distribution, recovery charges and fees payable for management of portfolio etc., are recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss on an accrual basis.

(iii) Taxes

Expenses are recognised net of the Goods and Services Tax/Service Tax, except where credit for the input tax is not statutorily permitted.

1.3 Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents include cash on hand, other short term, highly liquid investments with original maturities of three months or less that are readily convertible to known amounts of cash and which are subject to an insignificant risk of changes in value.

1.4 Financial instruments

A financial instrument is defined as any contract that gives rise to a financial asset of one entity and a financial liability or equity instrument of another entity. Trade receivables and payables, loan receivables, investments in securities and subsidiaries, debt securities and other borrowings, preferential and equity capital etc. are some examples of financial instruments.

All the financial instruments are recognised on the date when the Company becomes party to the contractual provisions of the financial instruments. For tradable securities, the Company recognises the financial instruments on settlement date.

(i) Financial assets

Financial assets include cash, or an equity instrument of another entity, or a contractual right to receive cash or another financial asset from another entity. Few examples of financial assets are loan receivables, investment in equity and debt instruments, trade receivables and cash and cash equivalents.

Initial measurement

All financial assets are recognised initially at fair value including transaction costs that are attributable to the acquisition of financial assets except in the case of financial assets recorded at FVTPL where the transaction costs are charged to profit or loss.

Subsequent measurement

For the purpose of subsequent measurement, financial assets are classified into four categories:

(a) Debt instruments at amortised cost

(b) Debt instruments at FVOCI

(c) Debt instruments at FVTPL

(d) Equity instruments designated at FVOCI

(a) Debt instruments at amortised cost

The Company measures its financial assets at amortised cost if both the following conditions are met:

- The asset is held within a business model of collecting contractual cash flows; and

- Contractual terms of the asset give rise on specified dates to cash flows that are Sole Payments of Principal and Interest (SPPI) on the principal amount outstanding.

To make the SPPI assessment, the Company applies judgment and considers relevant factors such as the nature of portfolio and the period for which the interest rate is set.

The Company determines its business model at the level that best reflects how it manages groups of financial assets to achieve its business objective. The Company’s business model is not assessed on an instrument by instrument basis, but at a higher level of aggregated portfolios. If cash flows after initial recognition are realised in a way that is different from the Company’s original expectations, the Company does not change the classification of the remaining financial assets held in that business model, but incorporates such information when assessing newly originated financial assets going forward.

The business model of the Company for assets subsequently measured at amortised cost category is to hold and collect contractual cash flows. However, considering the economic viability of carrying the delinquent portfolios in the books of the Company, it may sell these portfolios to banks and/or asset reconstruction companies.

After initial measurement, such financial assets are subsequently measured at amortised cost on effective interest rate (EIR). For further details, refer note no. 3.1(i). The expected credit loss (ECL) calculation for debt instruments at amortised cost is explained in subsequent notes in this section.

(b) Debt instruments at FVOCI

The Company subsequently classifies its financial assets as FVOCI, only if both of the following criteria are met:

- The objective of the business model is achieved both by collecting contractual cash flows and selling the financial assets; and

- Contractual terms of the asset give rise on specified dates to cash flows that are Solely Payments of Principal and Interest (SPPI) on the principal amount outstanding.

Debt instruments included within the FVOCI category are measured at each reporting date at fair value with such changes being recognised in other comprehensive income (OCI). The interest income on these assets is recognised in profit or loss. The ECL calculation for debt instruments at FVOCI is explained in subsequent notes in this section.

Debt instruments such as long term investments in Government securities to meet regulatory liquid asset requirement of the Company’s deposit program and mortgage loans portfolio where the Company periodically resorts to partially selling the loans by way of assignment to willing buyers are classified as FVOCI.

On derecognition of the asset, cumulative gain or loss previously recognised in OCI is reclassified to profit or loss.

(c) Debt instruments at FVTPL

The Company classifies financial assets which are held for trading under FVTPL category. Held for trading assets are recorded and measured in the Balance Sheet at fair value. Interest and dividend incomes are recorded in interest income and dividend income, respectively according to the terms of the contract, or when the right to receive the same has been established. Gain and losses on changes in fair value of debt instruments are recognised on net basis through profit or loss.

The Company’s investments into mutual funds, Government securities (trading portfolio) and certificate of deposits for trading and short term cash flow management have been classified under this category.

(d) Equity investments designated under FVOCI

All equity investments in scope of Ind AS 109 ‘Financial Instruments’ are measured at fair value. The Company has strategic investments in equity for which it has elected to present subsequent changes in the fair value in other comprehensive income. The classification is made on initial recognition and is irrevocable.

All fair value changes of the equity instruments, excluding dividends, are recognised in OCI and not available for reclassification to profit or loss, even on sale of investments. Equity instruments at FVOCI are not subject to an impairment assessment.

Derecognition of Financial Assets

The Company derecognises a financial asset (or, where applicable, a part of a financial asset) when:

- The right to receive cash flows from the asset have expired; or

- The Company has transferred its right to receive cash flows from the asset or has assumed an obligation to pay the received cash flows in full without material delay to a third party under an assignment arrangement and the Company has transferred substantially all the risks and rewards of the asset. Once the asset is derecognised, the Company does not have any continuing involvement in the same.

The Company transfers its financial assets through the partial assignment route and accordingly derecognises the transferred portion as it neither has any continuing involvement in the same nor does it retain any control. If the Company retains the right to service the financial asset for a fee, it recognises either a servicing asset or a servicing liability for that servicing contract. A service liability in respect of a service is recognised at fair value if the fee to be received is not expected to compensate the Company adequately for performing the service. If the fees to be received is expected to be more than adequate compensation for the servicing, a service asset is recognised for the servicing right at an amount determined on the basis of an allocation of the carrying amount of the larger financial asset.

On derecognition of a financial asset in its entirety, the difference between:

- the carrying amount (measured at the date of derecognition) and

- the consideration received (including any new asset obtained less any new liability assumed) is recognised in profit or loss.

Impairment of financial assets

ECL are recognised for financial assets held under amortised cost, debt instruments measured at FVOCI, and certain loan commitments.

Financial assets where no significant increase in credit risk has been observed are considered to be in ‘stage 1’ and for which a 12 month ECL is recognised. Financial assets that are considered to have significant increase in credit risk are considered to be in ‘stage 2’ and those which are in default or for which there is an objective evidence of impairment are considered to be in ‘stage 3’. Lifetime ECL is recognised for stage 2 and stage 3 financial assets.

At initial recognition, allowance (or provision in the case of loan commitments) is required for ECL towards default events that are possible in the next 12 months, or less, where the remaining life is less than 12 months.

In the event of a significant increase in credit risk, allowance (or provision) is required for ECL towards all possible default events over the expected life of the financial instrument (‘lifetime ECL’).

Financial assets (and the related impairment loss allowances) are written off in full, when there is no realistic prospect of recovery.

Treatment of the different stages of financial assets and the methodology of determination of ECL

(a) Credit impaired (stage 3)

The Company recognises a financial asset to be credit impaired and in stage 3 by considering relevant objective evidence, primarily whether:

- Contractual payments of either principal or interest are past due for more than 90 days;

- The loan is otherwise considered to be in default.

Restructured loans, where repayment terms are renegotiated as compared to the original contracted terms due to significant credit distress of the borrower, are classified as credit impaired. Such loans continue to be in stage 3 until they exhibit regular payment of renegotiated principal and interest over a minimum observation period, typically 12 months- post renegotiation, and there are no other indicators of impairment. Having satisfied the conditions of timely payment over the observation period these loans could be transferred to stage 1 or 2 and a fresh assessment of the risk of default be done for such loans.

Interest income is recognised by applying the EIR to the net amortised cost amount i.e. gross carrying amount less ECL allowance.

(b) Significant increase in credit risk (stage 2)

An assessment of whether credit risk has increased significantly since initial recognition is performed at each reporting period by considering the change in the risk of default of the loan exposure. However, unless identified at an earlier stage, 30 days past due is considered as an indication of financial assets to have suffered a significant increase in credit risk. Based on other indications such as borrower’s frequently delaying payments beyond due dates though not 30 days past due are included in stage 2 for mortgage loans.

The measurement of risk of defaults under stage 2 is computed on homogenous portfolios, generally by nature of loans, tenors, underlying collateral, geographies and borrower profiles. The default risk is assessed using PD (probability of default) derived from past behavioural trends of default across the identified homogenous portfolios. These past trends factor in the past customer behavioural trends, credit transition probabilities and macroeconomic conditions. The assessed PDs are then aligned considering future economic conditions that are determined to have a bearing on ECL.

(c) Without significant increase in credit risk since initial recognition (stage 1)

ECL resulting from default events that are possible in the next 12 months are recognised for financial instruments in stage 1. The Company has ascertained default possibilities on past behavioural trends witnessed for each homogenous portfolio using application/behaviourial score cards and other performance indicators, determined statistically.

(d) Measurement of ECL

The assessment of credit risk and estimation of ECL are unbiased and probability weighted. It incorporates all information that is relevant including information about past events, current conditions and reasonable forecasts of future events and economic conditions at the reporting date. In addition, the estimation of ECL takes into account the time value of money. Forward looking economic scenarios determined with reference to external forecasts of economic parameters that have demonstrated a linkage to the performance of our portfolios over a period of time have been applied to determine impact of macro economic factors.

The Company has calculated ECL using three main components: a probability of default (PD), a loss given default (LGD) and the exposure at default (EAD). ECL is calculated by multiplying the PD, LGD and EAD and adjusted for time value of money using a rate which is a reasonable approximation of EIR.

- Determination of PD is covered above for each stages of ECL.

- EAD represents the expected balance at default, taking into account the repayment of principal and interest from the Balance Sheet date to the date of default together with any expected drawdowns of committed facilities.

- LGD represents expected losses on the EAD given the event of default, taking into account, among other attributes, the mitigating effect of collateral value at the time it is expected to be realised and the time value of money.

A more detailed description of the methodology used for ECL is covered in the ‘credit risk’ section of note no. 49.

(ii) Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities include liabilities that represent a contractual obligation to deliver cash or another financial assets to another entity, or a contract that may or will be settled in the entities own equity instruments. Few examples of financial liabilities are trade payables, debt securities and other borrowings and subordinated debts.

Initial measurement

All financial liabilities are recognised initially at fair value and, in the case of borrowings and payables, net of directly attributable transaction costs. The Company’s financial liabilities include trade payables, other payables, debt securities and other borrowings.

Subsequent measurement

After initial recognition, all financial liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the EIR [Refer note no. 3.1(i)]. Any gains or losses arising on derecognition of liabilities are recognised in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

Derecognition

The Company derecognises a financial liability when the obligation under the liability is discharged, cancelled or expired.

(iii) Offsetting of financial instruments

Financial assets and financial liabilities are offset and the net amount is reported in the Balance Sheet only if there is an enforceable legal right to offset the recognised amounts with an intention to settle on a net basis or to realise the assets and settle the liabilities simultaneously.

1.5 Investment in subsidiaries

Investment in subsidiaries is recognised at cost and are not adjusted to fair value at the end of each reporting period. Cost of investment represents amount paid for acquisition of the said investment.

The Company assesses at the end of each reporting period, if there are any indications that the said investment may be impaired. If so, the Company estimates the recoverable value/amount of the investment and provides for impairment, if any i.e. the deficit in the recoverable value over cost.

1.6 Taxes

(i) Current tax

Current tax assets and liabilities are measured at the amount expected to be recovered from or paid to the taxation authorities, in accordance with the Income Tax Act, 1961 and the Income Computation and Disclosure Standards (ICDS) prescribed therein. The tax rates and tax laws used to compute the amount are those that are enacted or substantively enacted, at the reporting date.

Current tax relating to items recognised outside profit or loss is recognised in correlation to the underlying transaction either in OCI or directly in other equity. Management periodically evaluates positions taken in the tax returns with respect to situations in which applicable tax regulations are subject to interpretation and establishes provisions where appropriate.

(ii) Deferred tax

Deferred tax is provided using the Balance Sheet approach on temporary differences between the tax bases of assets and liabilities and their carrying amounts for financial reporting purposes at the reporting date.

Deferred tax liabilities are recognised for all taxable temporary differences and deferred tax assets are recognised for deductible temporary differences to the extent that it is probable that taxable profits will be available against which the deductible temporary differences can be utilised.

The carrying amount of deferred tax assets is reviewed at each reporting date and reduced to the extent that it is no longer probable that sufficient taxable profit will be available to allow all or part of the deferred tax asset to be utilised. Unrecognised deferred tax assets, if any, are reassessed at each reporting date and are recognised to the extent that it has become probable that future taxable profits will allow the deferred tax asset to be recovered.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured at the tax rates that are expected to apply in the year when the asset is realised or the liability is settled, based on tax rates (and tax laws) that have been enacted or substantively enacted at the reporting date.

Deferred tax relating to items recognised outside profit or loss is recognised either in OCI or in other equity.

Deferred tax assets and deferred tax liabilities are offset if a legally enforceable right exists to set off current tax assets against current tax liabilities and the deferred taxes relate to the same taxable entity and the same taxation authority.

1.7 Property, plant and equipment

Property, plant and equipment are carried at historical cost of acquisition less accumulated depreciation and impairment losses, consistent with the criteria specified in Ind AS 16 ‘Property, Plant and Equipment’.

Depreciation on property, plant and equipment

(a) Depreciation is provided on a pro-rata basis for all tangible assets on straight line method over the useful life of assets, except buildings which is determined on written down value method.

(b) Useful lives of assets are determined by the Management by an internal technical assessment except where such assessment suggests a life significantly different from those prescribed by Schedule II - Part C of the Companies Act, 2013 where the useful life is as assessed and certified by a technical expert.

(c) Depreciation on leasehold improvements is provided on straight line method over the primary period of lease of premises or 5 years whichever is less.

(d) Depreciation on addition to assets and assets sold during the year is being provided for on a pro rata basis with reference to the month in which such asset is added or sold as the case may be.

(e) Tangible assets which are depreciated over a useful life that is different than those indicated in Schedule II are as under:

(f) Assets having unit value up to RS. 5,000 is depreciated fully in the financial year of purchase of asset.

(g) An item of property, plant and equipment and any significant part initially recognised is derecognised upon disposal or when no future economic benefits are expected from its use or disposal. Any gain or loss arising on derecognition of the asset (calculated as the difference between the net disposal proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset) is included under other income in the Statement of Profit and Loss when the asset is derecognised.

(h) The residual values, useful lives and methods of depreciation of property, plant and equipment are reviewed at each financial year end and adjusted prospectively, if appropriate.

1.8 Intangible assets and amortisation thereof

Intangible assets, representing softwares are initially recognised at cost and subsequently carried at cost less accumulated amortisation and accumulated impairment. The intangible assets are amortised using the straight line method over a period of five years, which is the Management’s estimate of its useful life. The useful lives of intangible assets are reviewed at each financial year end and adjusted prospectively, if appropriate.

1.9 Impairment of non-financial assets

An assessment is done at each Balance Sheet date to ascertain whether there is any indication that an asset may be impaired. If any such indication exists, an estimate of the recoverable amount of asset is determined. If the carrying value of relevant asset is higher than the recoverable amount, the carrying value is written down accordingly.

1.10 Provisions and contingent liabilities

The Company creates a provision when there is present obligation as a result of a past event that probably requires an outflow of resources and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation.

A disclosure for a contingent liability is made when there is a possible obligation or a present obligation that may, but probably will not, require an outflow of resources. The Company also discloses present obligations for which a reliable estimate cannot be made. When there is a possible obligation or a present obligation in respect of which the likelihood of outflow of resources is remote, no provision or disclosure is made.

1.11 Foreign currency translation

The Company’s financial statements are presented in Indian Rupee, which is also the Company’s functional currency. Initial recognition

Foreign currency transactions are recorded in the reporting currency, by applying to the foreign currency amount the exchange rate between the reporting currency and the foreign currency at the date of the transaction.

Conversion

Foreign currency monetary items are re-translated using the exchange rate prevailing at the reporting date. Nonmonetary items, which are measured in terms of historical cost denominated in a foreign currency, are reported using the exchange rate at the date of the transaction.

Exchange differences

All exchange differences are accounted in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

1.12 Retirement and other employee benefits

(i) Gratuity

Payment for present liability of future payment of gratuity is made to the approved gratuity fund viz.

Bajaj Auto Ltd. Gratuity Fund Trust, which covers the same under cash accumulation policy and debt fund of the Life Insurance Corporation of India (LIC) and Bajaj Allianz Life Insurance Company Ltd. (BALICL). However, any deficits in plan assets managed by LIC and BALICL as compared to actuarial liability determined by an appointed actuary using the projected unit credit method are recognised as a liability. Gains and losses through remeasurements of the net defined benefit liability/assets are recognised immediately in the Balance Sheet with a corresponding debit or credit to retained earnings through OCI in the period in which they occur. The effect of any planned amendments are recognised in Statement of Profit and Loss. Remeasurements are not reclassified to profit or loss in subsequent periods.

(ii) Superannuation

Defined contribution to superannuation fund is made as per the scheme of the Company.

(iii) Provident fund

Contributions are made to Bajaj Auto Ltd. Provident Fund Trust. Deficits, if any, of the fund as compared to aggregate liability is additionally contributed by the Company and recognised as an expense. Shortfall in fund assets over present obligation determined using the projected unit credit method by an appointed actuary is recognised as a liability.

(iv) Compensated absences

Privilege leave entitlements are recognised as a liability as per the rules of the Company. The liability for accumulated leaves which can be availed and/or encashed at any time during the tenure of employment is recognised using the projected unit credit method at the actuarially determined value by an appointed actuary. The liability for accumulated leaves which is eligible for encashment within the same calendar year is provided for at prevailing salary rate for the entire unavailed leave balance as at the Balance Sheet date.

Remeasurements, comprising of actuarial gains and losses, the effect of the asset ceiling, excluding amounts included in net interest on the net defined benefit liability and the return on plan assets, are recognised immediately in the Balance Sheet with a corresponding debit or credit to retained earnings through OCI in the period in which they occur. Remeasurements are not reclassified to profit or loss in subsequent periods.

1.13 Employee Stock Option Scheme

The Company operates Employee Stock Option Scheme through a trust formed for the purpose. Equity shares are issued to the trust on the basis of the Company’s expectation of the number of options that may be exercised by employees.

The cost of equity-settled transactions is determined by the fair value at the date when the grant is made using an appropriate valuation model.

The cost is recognised in employee benefits expenses together with a corresponding increase in employee stock option outstanding account in other equity, over the period in which the service conditions are fulfilled. The cumulative expense recognised for equity-settled transactions at each reporting date until the vesting date reflects the extent to which the vesting period has not expired and the Company’s best estimate of the number of equity instruments that will ultimately vest.

Service conditions are not taken into account when determining the grant date fair value of awards, but the likelihood of the conditions being met is assessed as part of the Company’s best estimate of the number of equity instruments that will ultimately vest. Non- market performance conditions are reflected within the grant date fair value.

No expense is recognised for awards that do not ultimately vest because non-market performance and/or service conditions are not met.

The balance equity shares not exercised and held by the trust are disclosed as a reduction from the share capital and securities premium account with an equivalent adjustment to the subscription loan advanced to the trust.

1.14 Leases

The determination of whether an arrangement is, or contains, a lease is based on the substance of the arrangement at the inception of the lease. The arrangement is, or contains, a lease if fulfilment of the arrangement is dependent on the use of a specific asset or assets and the arrangement conveys a right to use the asset or assets, even if that right is not explicitly specified in an arrangement.

Company acting as a lessee

A lease is classified at the inception date as a finance lease or an operating lease. A lease that transfers substantially all the risks and rewards incidental to ownership to the Company is classified as a finance lease. All other leases are classified as operating leases. Basis the above principle, all leases entered into by the Company as a lessee have been classified as operating leases.

Lease payments under an operating lease is recognised on an accrual basis in the Statement of Profit and Loss.

1.15 Fair value measurement

The Company measures its qualifying financial instruments at fair value on each Balance Sheet date.

Fair value is the price that would be received against sale of an asset or paid to transfer a liability in an orderly transaction between market participants at the measurement date. The fair value measurement is based on the presumption that the transaction to sell the asset or transfer the liability takes place in the accessible principal market or the most advantageous accessible market as applicable.

The Company uses valuation techniques that are appropriate in the circumstances and for which sufficient data is available to measure fair value, maximising the use of relevant observable inputs and minimising the use of unobservable inputs.

All assets and liabilities for which fair value is measured or disclosed in the financial statements are categorised within the fair value hierarchy into Level I, Level II and Level III based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement as a whole. For a detailed information on the fair value hierarchy, refer note no. 47 and 48.

For assets and liabilities that are fair valued in the financial statements on a recurring basis, the Company determines whether transfers have occurred between levels in the hierarchy by re-assessing categorisation (based on the lowest level input that is significant to the fair value measurement as a whole) at the end of each reporting period.

For the purpose of fair value disclosures, the Company has determined classes of assets and liabilities on the basis of the nature, characteristics and risks of the asset or liability and the level of the fair value hierarchy.

Source : Dion Global Solutions Limited
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