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you are here: HomeNewsScience
Jan 12, 2018 06:33 PM IST | Source: Moneycontrol.com

New study says other solar systems organised like 'peas in a pod' unlike ours

The Kepler Telescope has played a big role in widening the horizon of human knowledge regarding the outer space

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NASA’s space telescope Kepler used machine learning to discover an eighth planet in a solar system 2,500 light-years away (NASA)
NASA’s space telescope Kepler used machine learning to discover an eighth planet in a solar system 2,500 light-years away (NASA)

Planets beyond our solar system orbiting stars tend to have similar sizes and a regular orbital spacing, a study has claimed. The findings made by a team of international researchers indicate that most solar systems had different beginnings compared to our solar system.

The findings were made by a team that was led by Université de Montréal astrophysicist Lauren Weiss. As per a report in Phys.org, the team understood the pattern with the use of the new W. M. Keck Observatory observations of planetary systems discovered by the Kepler Telescope.

The Kepler Telescope has played a big role in widening the horizon of human knowledge regarding the outer space. Thousands of new space bodies including several exoplanets are now known to humans due to it.

In order to reach the conclusion, the team studied 909 planets belonging to 355 multi-planet systems located between 1,000 and 4,000 light-years away from Earth. After a thorough analysis, the team came up with two conclusions, i.e. that the planets in the same solar system showed identical sizes and consistent orbital patterns. "The planets in a system tend to be the same size and regularly spaced, like peas in a pod. These patterns would not occur if the planet sizes or spacings were drawn at random," Weiss was quoted as saying in the report.

The findings point out that most solar systems originated quite differently than our solar system where planets are not only of different sizes but also have a quite unidentical orbiting pattern. However, the patterns shown by exoplanets may indicate that their systems were rarely disturbed since their formation.

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