Richard Fuld, life after Lehman crisis

Richard Fuld was a star on Wall Street, the longest running CEO of any firm. In 2007, he mounted a vicious campaign against short-sellers that he said were trying to put Lehman out of business.
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Sep 16, 2013, 10.17 PM | Source: CNBC-TV18

Richard Fuld, life after Lehman crisis

Richard Fuld was a star on Wall Street, the longest running CEO of any firm. In 2007, he mounted a vicious campaign against short-sellers that he said were trying to put Lehman out of business.

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Richard Fuld, life after Lehman crisis

Richard Fuld was a star on Wall Street, the longest running CEO of any firm. In 2007, he mounted a vicious campaign against short-sellers that he said were trying to put Lehman out of business.

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It has been 5 years since the collapse of Lehman Brothers shook the world. The crisis has led to some tectonic changes across the financial landscape as regulators are now putting a microscope over products sold by banks and other institutions. ( Read More )

But, life goes on for the corporate bigwigs who triggered the collapse. The CEO of Lehman Brothers, Richard Fuld has wriggled out of all the lawsuits and leads a comfortable life today. Here is a report on CNBC-TV18.

Richard Fuld was a star on Wall Street, the longest running CEO of any firm. In 2007, he mounted a vicious campaign against short-sellers that he said were trying to put Lehman out of business.

Richard Fuld, former chairman and CEO, Lehman Brothers says “what I really want to do is I want to reach in, rip out their hearts and eat it before they die.”

Five years after Lehman's collapse, Fuld is chasing. He has a small consulting firm in Manhattan, no high profile clients or at least now they are saying so. Of the clients he has, one warrant his tarnished reputation could potentially be damaging. Fuld has spent much of the five years trying to avoid criminal and civil charges. He ran up legal bills into millions of dollars, much of it paid by the Lehman Estate.

Department of Justice (DoJ) and Securities and Exchange Commission (Sec) dropped their investigations after they concluded they didn’t have enough evidence against him. Fuld has kept a low profile, occasionally he's been seen dining at the four seasons with former colleagues and peers, and he's been spotted on the weekends flying coach to one of his homes in Florida.

While he rode his Lehman stock all the way down from a billion dollars to USD 56,000, he's not exactly poor. He still has his mansion worth over USD 8 million and sold a Park Avenue apartment and some art for over USD 46 million.

He recently made headlines, suing his former son-in-law for USD 13 million over a loan for an apartment. Fuld and his lawyers did not return calls for comment but he has told friends and others that he's still consumed thinking about Lehman Brothers.

Richard Fuld, former chairman and CEO, Lehman Brothers says “what I really want to do is I want to reach in, rip out their hearts and eat it before they die.”

Five years after Lehman's collapse, Fuld is chasing. He has a small consulting firm in Manhattan, no high profile clients or at least now they are saying so. Of the clients he has, one warrant his tarnished reputation could potentially be damaging.

Fuld has spent much of the five years trying to avoid criminal and civil charges. He ran up legal bills into millions of dollars, much of it paid by the Lehman Estate. Department of Justice (DoJ) and Securities and Exchange Commission (Sec) dropped their investigations after they concluded they didn’t have enough evidence against him.

Fuld has kept a low profile, occasionally he's been seen dining at the four seasons with former colleagues and peers, and he's been spotted on the weekends flying coach to one of his homes in Florida.

While he rode his Lehman stock all the way down from a billion dollars to USD 56,000, he's not exactly poor. He still has his mansion worth over USD 8 million and sold a Park Avenue apartment and some art for over USD 46 million. He recently made headlines, suing his former son-in-law for USD 13 million over a loan for an apartment.

Fuld and his lawyers did not return calls for comment but he has told friends and others that he's still consumed thinking about Lehman Brothers.

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Richard Fuld, life after Lehman crisis

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