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Hindalco Industries

BSE: 500440|NSE: HINDALCO|ISIN: INE038A01020|SECTOR: Aluminium
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Mar 16
Accounting Policy Year : Mar '17

I. Significant Accounting Policies

A summary of the significant accounting policies applied in the preparation of the financial statements are as given below. These accounting policies have been applied consistently to all the periods presented in the financial statements.

A. Investment in Subsidiaries and Joint Ventures

The investments in subsidiaries and joint ventures are carried in these financial statements at historical cost except when the investment, or a portion thereof, is classified as held for sale, in which case it is accounted for as Non-current assets held for sale and discontinued operations. When the Company is committed to a sale plan involving disposal of an investment, or a portion of an investment, in an associate or joint venture, the investment or the portion of the investment that will be disposed of is classified as held for sale when the criteria described above are met. Any retained portion of an investment in an associate or a joint venture that has not been classified as held for sale continues to be accounted for at historical cost.

B. Investment in Associates

The investments in associates are carried in these financial statements at fair Value through Other Comprehensive Income (OCI) except when the investment, or a portion thereof, is classified as held for sale, in which case it is accounted for as Non-current assets held for sale and discontinued operations. When the Company is committed to a sale plan involving disposal of an investment, or a portion of an investment in an associate the investment or the portion of the investment that will be disposed of is classified as held for sale when the criteria described above are met. Any retained portion of an investment in an associate that has not been classified as held for sale continues to be accounted for at fair value through OCI.

Upon loss of significant influence over the associate the Company measures and recognises any retained investment at its fair value. Any difference between the carrying amount of the associate and the fair value of retained investment and proceeds from disposal is recognised in profit or loss.

C. Investment in Joint Operation

A joint operation is a joint arrangement whereby the parties that have joint control of the arrangement have rights to the assets, and obligations for the liabilities, relating to the arrangement. Joint control is the contractually agreed sharing of control of an arrangement, which exists only when decisions about the relevant activities require unanimous consent of the parties sharing control.

When the Company undertakes its activities under joint operations, the Company as a joint operator recognises in relation to its interest in a joint operation:

- its assets, including its share of any assets held jointly;

- its liabilities, including its share of any liabilities incurred jointly;

- its revenue from the sale of its share of the output arising from the joint operation;

- its share of the revenue from the sale of the output by the joint operation; and

- its expenses, including its share of any expenses incurred jointly

The Company accounts for the assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses relating to its interest in a joint operation in accordance with the standards applicable to the particular assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses.

When the Company transacts with a joint operation in which the Company is a joint operator (such as a sale or contribution of assets), the Company is considered to be conducting the transaction with the other parties to the joint operation, and gains and losses resulting from the transactions are recognised in the financial statements only to the extent of other parties’ interests in the joint operation.

When the Company transacts with a joint operation in which the Company is a joint operator (such as a purchase of assets), the Company does not recognise its share of the gains and losses until it resells those assets to a third party.

D. Property, Plant and Equipment

Property, plant and equipment held for use in the production or/and supply of goods or services, or for administrative purposes, are stated in the balance sheet at cost, less any subsequent accumulated depreciation and subsequent accumulated impairment losses.

The initial cost at cash price equivalence of property, plant and equipment acquired comprises its purchase price, including import duties and non-refundable purchase taxes, any directly attributable costs of bringing the assets to its working condition and location and present value of any obligatory decommissioning costs for its intended use. Cost may also include effective portion on qualifying cash flow hedges of foreign currency purchases of property, plant and equipment recycled from hedge reserve as basis adjustment.

In case of self-constructed assets, cost includes the costs of all materials used in construction, direct labour, allocation of overheads, directly attributable borrowing costs and effective portion of cash flow hedges of foreign currency recycled from the hedge reserve as basis adjustment.

Subsequent expenditure on major maintenance or repairs includes the cost of the replacement of parts of assets and overhaul costs. Where an asset or part of an asset is replaced and it is probable that future economic benefits associated with the item will be available to the Company, the expenditure is capitalised and the carrying amount of the item replaced is derecognised. Similarly, overhaul costs associated with major maintenance are capitalised and depreciated over their useful lives where it is probable that future economic benefits will be available and any remaining carrying amounts of the cost of previous overhauls are derecognised. All other costs are expensed as incurred.

Capital work-in-progress

Capital work-in-progress assets in the course of construction for production or/and supply of goods or services or administrative purposes, or for purposes not yet determined, are carried at cost, less any recognised impairment loss. At the point when an asset is operating at management’s intended use, the cost of construction is transferred to the appropriate category of property, plant and equipment. Costs associated with the commissioning of an asset are capitalised where the asset is available for use but incapable of operating at normal levels until a period of commissioning has been completed.

Depreciation

Depreciation is charged so as to write off the cost or value of assets, over their estimated useful lives or, in the case of leased assets (including leasehold improvements), over the lease term if shorter. The lease period is considered by excluding any lease renewals options, unless the renewals are reasonably certain. Depreciation is recorded using the straight line basis. The estimated useful lives and residual values are reviewed at each year end, with the effect of any changes in estimate accounted for on a prospective basis. Each component of an item of property, plant and equipment with a cost that is significant in relation to the total cost of that item is depreciated separately if its useful life differs from the others components of the asset.

Depreciation commences when the assets are ready for their intended use. Depreciated assets in property and accumulated depreciation accounts are retained fully until they are removed from service.

The useful life of the items of PPE estimated by the management for the current and comparative period are in line with the useful life as per Schedule II of the Companies Act , 2013.

Disposal of assets

An item of property, plant and equipment is derecognised upon disposal or when no future economic benefits are expected to arise from the continued use of the asset. Any gain or loss arising on the disposal or retirement of an item of property, plant and equipment is determined as the difference between net disposal proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset and is recognised in the statement of profit and loss.

Mining Reserves, Resources and Rights (Mining Rights)

Mineral reserves, resources and rights (together mining rights) which can be reasonably valued, are recognised in the assessment of fair values on acquisition. Exploitable mineral rights are amortised using the unit of production basis over the commercially recoverable reserves. Mineral resources are included in amortisation calculations where there is a high degree of confidence that they will be extracted in an economic manner. Commercially recoverable reserves are proved and probable reserves. Changes in the commercial recoverable reserves affecting unit of production calculations are dealt with prospectively over the revised remaining reserves.

E. Stripping Cost

Stripping costs incurred during the mining production phase are allocated between cost of inventory produced and the existing mine asset.

Stripping costs are allocated and included as a component of the mine asset when they represent significantly improved access to ore provided all the following conditions are met:

- it is probable that the future economic benefit associated with the stripping activity will be realised;

- the component of the ore body for which access has been improved can be identified; and

- the costs relating to the stripping activity associated with the improved access can be reliably measured.

The stripping activity asset is subsequently amortised on a unit of production basis over the life of the identified component of the ore body. The expenditure which cannot be specifically identified to have been incurred to access ore is charged to revenue, based on stripping ratio as per the mining plan.

F. Investment Property

Investment properties held to earn rentals or for capital appreciation or both are stated in the balance sheet at cost, less any subsequent accumulated depreciation and subsequent accumulated impairment losses. Any gain or loss on disposal of investment property is determined as the difference between net disposal proceeds and the carrying amount of the property and is recognised in the statement of profit and loss. Transfer to, or from, investment property is done at the carrying amount of the property.

G. Intangible Assets (Other than goodwill)

Intangible assets acquired separately

Intangible assets acquired are reported at cost less accumulated amortization and accumulated impairment losses. Amortization is charged over their estimated useful lives. The estimated useful life and amortization method are reviewed at the end of each annual reporting period, with the effect of any changes in estimate being accounted for on a prospective basis.

Internally-generated intangible assets - research and development expenditure Expenditure on research activities is recognized as an expense in the period in which it is incurred. An internally-generated intangible asset arising from development (or from the development phase of an internal project) is recognized if, and only if all of the following can be demonstrated:

- the technical feasibility of completing the intangible asset so that it will be available for use or sale;

- the intention to complete the intangible asset and use or sell it;

- the ability to use or sell the intangible asset;

- how the intangible asset will generate probable future economic benefits;

- the availability of adequate technical, financial and other resources to complete the development and to use or sell the intangible asset; and

- the ability to measure reliably the expenditure attributable to the intangible asset during its development.

The amount initially recognized for internally-generated intangible assets is the sum of the expenditure incurred from the date when the intangible asset is recognised. Where no internally-generated intangible asset can be recognized, development expenditure is charged to the statement of profit and loss in the period in which it is incurred.

Subsequent to initial recognition, internally-generated intangible assets are reported at cost less accumulated amortization and accumulated impairment losses, on the same basis as intangible assets acquired separately.

Derecognition of intangible assets

An intangible asset is derecognised on disposal, or when no future economic benefits are expected from use or disposal. Gains or losses arising from derecognition of an intangible asset, measured as the difference between the net disposal proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset are recognised in the statement of profit and loss when the asset is derecognised.

Intangible assets with indefinite useful lives and intangible assets not yet available for use are tested for impairment annually, and whenever there is an indication that the asset may be impaired.

H. Non-current assets (or disposal groups) held for sale

Non-current assets and disposal groups are classified as held for sale if their carrying amount will be recovered principally through a sale transaction rather than through continuing use. This condition is regarded as met only when the asset (or disposal Company) is available for immediate sale in its present condition subject only to terms that are usual and customary for sales of such asset (or disposal Company) and its sale is highly probable. Management must be committed to the sale, which should be expected to qualify for recognition as a completed sale within one year from the date of classification.

Non-current assets (and disposal groups) classified as held for sale are measured at the lower of their carrying amount and fair value less costs to sell.

I. Impairment

Impairment of tangible and intangible assets excluding Goodwill

At the end of each reporting period, the Company reviews the carrying amounts of its tangible and intangible assets to determine whether there is any indication that those assets have suffered an impairment loss. If any such indication exists, the recoverable amount of the asset/cash generating unit is estimated in order to determine the extent of the impairment loss (if any). Recoverable amount is the higher of fair value less cost to sell and Value in use. Where it is not possible to estimate the recoverable amount of an individual asset, the Company estimates the recoverable amount of the cash-generating unit to which the asset belongs. Where a reasonable and consistent basis of allocation can be identified, corporate assets are also allocated to individual cash-generating units, or otherwise they are allocated to the smallest Company of cash-generating units for which a reasonable and consistent allocation basis can be identified.

Recoverable amount is the higher of fair value less costs to sell and value in use. In assessing value in use, the estimated future cash flows are discounted to their present value using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset for which the estimates of future cash flows have not been adjusted.

If the recoverable amount of an asset (or cash-generating unit) is estimated to be less than its carrying amount, the carrying amount of the asset (or cash-generating unit) is reduced to its recoverable amount. An impairment loss is recognised immediately in the statement of profit and loss.

Where an impairment loss subsequently reverses, the carrying amount of the asset (or cash-generating unit) is increased to the revised estimate of its recoverable amount, but so that the increased carrying amount does not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined had no impairment loss been recognised for the asset (or cash-generating unit) in prior years. A reversal of an impairment loss is recognised immediately in the statement of profit and loss.

J Foreign currency Transactions

In preparing the financial statements transactions in currencies other than the Company’s functional currency (foreign currencies) are recognised at the rates of exchange prevailing at the dates of the transactions. At the end of each reporting period, monetary items denominated in foreign currencies are translated at the rates prevailing at that date. Non-monetary items are measured at historical cost. Exchange differences on monetary items are recognised in the statement of profit and loss in the period in which they arise except for:

- eligible exchange differences on foreign currency borrowings relating to qualifying assets under construction are included in the cost of those assets when they are regarded as an adjustment to interest;

- exchange differences on transactions entered into in order to hedge certain foreign currency risks (see below for hedge accounting policies); and

- exchange differences on monetary items receivable from or payable to a foreign operation for which settlement is neither planned nor likely to occur (therefore forming part of the net investment in the foreign operation), which are recognised initially in other comprehensive income and reclassified from equity to the statement of profit and loss on repayment of the monetary items.

Changes in the fair value of financial asset denominated in foreign currency classified as Fair Value through Other Comprehensive Income are analysed between differences resulting from exchange differences related to changes in the amortised cost of the security and other changes in the carrying amount of the security. Exchange differences related to changes in amortised cost are recognised in the statement of profit and loss, and other changes in carrying amount are recognised in other comprehensive income.

Changes in the fair value of non-monetary equity instruments irrevocably classified as fair value through other comprehensive income includes gain or loss on account of exchange differences.

The fair value of financial liabilities denominated in a foreign currency is translated at the spot rate at the end of the reporting period. The foreign exchange component forms part of its fair value gain or loss.

K. Provisions and Contingencies

Provisions are recognized when there is a present obligation (legal or constructive) as a result of a past event and it is probable (“more likely than not”) that it is required to settle the obligation, and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation.

The amount recognised as a provision is the best estimate of the consideration required to settle the present obligation at the balance sheet date, taking into account the risks and uncertainties surrounding the obligation. Where a provision is measured using the estimated cash flows to settle the present obligation, its carrying amount is the present value of those cash flows. The discount rate used is a pre-tax rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money in that jurisdiction and the risks specific to the liability.

Onerous contracts

Present obligations arising under onerous contracts are recognised and measured as provisions. An onerous contract is considered to exist when a contract under which the unavoidable costs of meeting the obligations exceed the economic benefits expected to be received from it.

Restructurings

A restructuring provision is recognised when there is a detailed formal plan for the restructuring which has raised a valid expectation in those affected. The measurement of a restructuring provision includes only the direct expenditures arising from the restructuring.

Restoration (including Mine closure), rehabilitation and decommissioning

Close-down and restoration costs are provided for in the accounting period when the obligation arising from the related disturbance occurs, based on the net present value of the estimated future costs of restoration to be incurred during the life of the mining operation and post closure. Provisions for close-down and restoration costs do not include any additional obligations which are expected to arise from future disturbance.

The initial close-down and restoration provision is capitalised. Subsequent movements in the close-down and restoration provisions for ongoing operations, including those resulting from new disturbance related to expansions or other activities qualifying for capitalisation, updated cost estimates, changes to the estimated lives of operations, changes to the timing of closure activities and revisions to discount rates are also capitalised within “Property, plant and equipment”.

Environmental Liabilities

Environment liabilities are recognised when the Company becomes obliged, legally or constructively to rectify environmental damage or perform remediation work.

Litigation

Provision is recognised once it has been established that the Company has a present obligation based on consideration of the information which becomes available up to the date on which the Company’s financial statements are finalised and may in some cases entail seeking expert advice in making the determination on whether there is a present obligation.

L. Leases

Leases are classified as finance leases whenever the terms of the lease transfers substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership to the lessee. All other leases are classified as operating leases.

The Company as lessor

Amounts due from lessees’ under finance leases are recorded as receivables at the amount of net investment in the leases. Finance lease income is allocated to accounting periods so as to reflect a constant periodic rate of return on the Company’s net investment outstanding in respect of the leases.

Rental income from operating leases is recognised on a straight-line basis over the term of the relevant lease. Initial direct costs incurred in negotiating and arranging an operating lease are added to the carrying amount of the leased asset and recognised on a straight-line basis over the lease term.

The Company as lessee

Assets held under finance leases are initially recognised at their fair value at the inception of the lease or, if lower, at the present value of the minimum lease payments. The corresponding liability to the lessor is included in the balance sheet as a finance lease obligation.

Lease payments are apportioned between finance charges and reduction of the lease obligation so as to achieve a constant rate of interest on the remaining balance of the liability. Finance charges are charged directly to the statement of profit and loss, unless they are directly attributable to qualifying assets, in which case they are capitalised in accordance with the Company’s general policy on borrowing costs. Contingent rentals are recognised as expenses in the periods in which they are incurred. Operating lease payments are recognised as an expense on a straight-line basis over the lease term, except where another systematic basis is more representative of the time pattern in which economic benefits from the leased asset are consumed. Variable increases in lease payments which are linked to an inflation price index are considered as contingent rentals and are recognised on a straight-line basis. Contingent rentals arising under operating leases are recognised as an expense in the period in which they are incurred.

In the event that lease incentives are received to enter into operating leases, such incentives are recognised as a liability. The aggregate benefit of incentives is recognised as a reduction of rental expense on a straight-line basis, except where another systematic basis is more representative of the time pattern in which economic benefits from the leased asset are consumed.

M. Inventories

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost and net realizable value. The cost of finished goods and work in progress includes raw materials, direct labour, other direct costs and related production overheads. Costs of inventories include the transfer from equity any gains/losses on qualifying cash flow hedges for purchases of raw materials.

The Inventories are measured at Fair Value only in those cases where the Inventories are designated into a fair value hedge relationship.

Cost is determined using the weighted average cost basis. However, the same cost basis is applied to all inventories of a particular class. Inventories of stores and spare parts are valued at weighted average cost basis after providing for cost of obsolescence and other anticipated losses, wherever considered necessary.

However, materials and other supplies held for use in the production of inventories (finished goods, work-in-progress) are not written down below the cost if the finished products in which they will be used are expected to sell at or above the cost.

Net realizable value represents the estimated selling price for inventories less all estimated costs of completion and costs necessary to make the sale.

N. Trade receivable

Trade receivables are amounts due from customers for goods sold or services performed in the ordinary course of business. If the receivable is expected to be collected within a period of 12 months or less from the reporting date (or in the normal operating cycle of the business, if longer), they are classified as current assets otherwise as non-current assets.

Trade receivables are measured at their transaction price unless it contains a significant financing component or pricing adjustments embedded in the contract.

Trade receivables which arise from contracts where the sale price is provisional and revenue model have the character of a commodity derivative are measured at fair value. The fair value is measured at forward rate and recognised as an adjustment to revenue.

Loss allowance for expected life time credit loss is recognised on initial recognition.

All financial assets are recognised on trade date when the purchase of a financial asset is under a contract whose term requires delivery of the financial asset within the timeframe established by the market concerned. Financial assets are initially measured at fair value, plus transaction costs, except for those financial assets which are classified as at fair value through profit or loss (FVTPL) at inception. All recognised financial assets are subsequently measured in their entirety at either amortised cost or fair value.

Classification of financial assets

Financial assets are classified as ‘equity instrument’ if it is a non-derivative and meets the definition of ‘equity’ for the issuer. All other non-derivative financial assets are ‘debt instruments’.

Financial assets at amortised cost and the effective interest method

Debt instruments are measured at amortised cost if both of the following conditions are met:

- the asset is held within a business model whose objective is to hold assets in order to collect contractual cash flows; and

- the contractual terms of the instrument give rise on specified dates to cash flows that are solely payments of principal and interest on the principal amount outstanding.

Debt instruments meeting these criteria are measured initially at fair value plus transaction costs. They are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less any impairment, with interest recognised on an effective yield basis in investment income.

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a debt instrument and of allocating interest over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts the estimated future cash receipts (including all fees on points paid or received that form an integral part of the effective interest rate, transaction costs and other premiums or discounts) through the expected life of the debt instrument, or (where appropriate) a shorter period, to the net carrying amount on initial recognition.

The Company may irrevocably elect at initial recognition to classify a debt instrument that meets the amortised cost criteria above as at FVTPL if that designation eliminates or significantly reduces an accounting mismatch had the financial asset been measured at amortised cost.

Financial assets at fair value through other comprehensive income (FVTOCI)

Debt instruments are measured at FVTOCI if both of the following conditions are met:

- the asset is held within a business model whose objective is to hold assets in order to collect contractual cash flows and selling assets; and

- the contractual terms of the instrument give rise on specified dates to cash flows that are solely payments of principal and interest on the principal amount outstanding.

Debt instruments meeting these criteria are measured initially at fair value plus transaction costs. They are subsequently measured at fair value with any gains or losses arising on Remeasurement recognised in other comprehensive income, except for impairment gains or losses and foreign exchange gains or losses. Interest calculated using the effective interest method is recognised in the statement of profit and loss in investment income. When the debt instrument is derecognised the cumulative gain or loss previously recognised in other comprehensive income is reclassified to the statement of profit and loss account as a reclassification adjustment.

At initial recognition, an irrevocable election is made (on an instrument-by-instrument basis) to designate investments in equity instruments other than held for trading purpose at FVTOCI.

A financial asset is held for trading if:

- it has been acquired principally for the purpose of selling it in the near term; or

- on initial recognition it is part of a portfolio of identified financial instruments that the Company manages together and has evidence of a recent actual pattern of short-term profit-taking; or

- it is a derivative that is not designated and effective as a hedging instrument or a financial guarantee.

Investments in equity instruments at FVTOCI are initially measured at fair value plus transaction costs. Subsequently, they are measured at fair value with gains and losses arising from changes in fair value recognised in other comprehensive income. Where the asset is disposed of, the cumulative gain or loss previously accumulated in the Other Comprehensive Income is directly reclassified to retained earnings.

For equity instruments measured at fair value through other comprehensive income no impairments are recognised in the statement of profit and loss.

Dividends on these investments in equity instruments are recognised in the statement of profit and loss in investment income when the Company’s right to receive the dividends is established, it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the dividend will flow to the entity; and the amount of the dividend can be measured reliably.

Financial assets at Fair Value through Profit and Loss (FVTPL)

Financial assets that do not meet the criteria of classifying as amortised cost or fair value through other comprehensive income described above, or that meet the criteria but the entity has chosen to designate as at FVTPL at initial recognition, are measured at FVTPL.

Investments in equity instruments are classified as at FVTPL, unless the Company designates an investment that is not held for trading at FVTOCI at initial recognition.

Financial assets classified at FVTPL are initially measured at fair value excluding transaction costs.

Financial assets at FVTPL are subsequently measured at fair value, with any gains or losses arising on remeasurement recognised in the statement of profit and loss.

Dividend income on investments in equity instruments at FVTPL is recognised in the statement of profit and loss in investment income when the Company’s right to receive the dividends is established, it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the dividend will flow to the entity; and the amount of the dividend can be measured reliably.

Impairment of financial assets

On initial recognition of the financial assets, a loss allowance for expected credit loss is recognised for debt instruments at amortised cost and FVTOCI. For debt instruments that are measured at FVTOCI, the loss allowance is recognised in other comprehensive income in the statement of profit and loss and does not reduce the carrying amount of the financial asset in the balance sheet. Expected credit losses of a financial instrument is measured in a way that reflects:

- an unbiased and probability-weighted amount that is determined by evaluating a range of possible outcomes;

- the time value of money; and

- reasonable and supportable information that is available without undue cost or effort at the reporting date about past events, current conditions and forecasts of future economic conditions.

At each reporting date, the Company assesses whether the credit risk on a financial instrument has increased significantly since initial recognition.

When making the assessment, the Company compares the risk of a default occurring on the financial instrument as at the reporting date with the risk of a default occurring on the financial instrument as at the date of initial recognition and consider reasonable and supportable information, that is available without undue cost or effort, that is indicative of significant increases in credit risk since initial recognition.

If, at the reporting date, the credit risk on a financial instrument has not increased significantly since initial recognition, the Company measures the loss allowance for that financial instrument at an amount equal to 12-month expected credit losses. If, the credit risk on that financial instrument has increased significantly since initial recognition, the Company measures the loss allowance for a financial instrument at an amount equal to the lifetime expected credit losses.

The amount of expected credit losses (or reversal) that is required to adjust the loss allowance at the reporting date is recognised as an impairment gain or loss in the statement of profit and loss.

Derecognition of financial assets

The Company derecognises a financial asset on trade date only when the contractual rights to the cash flows from the asset expire, or when it transfers the financial asset and substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of the asset to another entity. If the Company neither transfers nor retains substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership and continues to control the transferred asset, the Company recognises its retained interest in the asset and an associated liability for amounts it may have to pay. If the Company retains substantially all the risks and rewards of ownership of a transferred financial asset, the Company continues to recognise the financial asset and also recognises a collateralised borrowing for the proceeds received.

On derecognition of a financial asset other than in its entirety (e.g. when the Company retains an option to repurchase part of a transferred asset), the Company allocates the previous carrying amount of the financial asset between the part it continues to recognise under continuing involvement, and the part it no longer recognises on the basis of the relative fair values of those parts on the date of the transfer. The difference between the carrying amount allocated to the part that is no longer recognised and the sum of the consideration received for the part no longer recognised and any cumulative gain or loss allocated to it that had been recognised in other comprehensive income is recognised in the statement of profit and loss. Cumulative gain or loss that had been recognised in other comprehensive income is allocated between the part that continues to be recognised and the part that is no longer recognised on the basis of the relative fair values of those parts.

Financial liabilities and equity instruments issued by the Company

Classification as debt or equity

Debt and equity instruments are classified as either financial liabilities or as equity in accordance with the substance of the contractual arrangement.

Equity instruments

An equity instrument is any contract that evidences a residual interest in the assets of an entity after deducting all of its liabilities. Equity instruments issued by the Company are recognised at the proceeds received, net of direct issue costs.

Compound instruments

The component parts of compound instruments (convertible instruments) issued by the Company are classified separately as financial liabilities and equity in accordance with the substance of the contractual arrangement. At the date of issue, the fair value of the liability component is estimated using the prevailing market interest rate for a similar non-convertible instrument. This amount is recorded as a liability on an amortised cost basis using the effective interest method until extinguished upon conversion or at the instrument’s maturity date. The equity component is determined by deducting the amount of the liability component from the fair value of the compound instrument as a whole. This is recognised and included in equity, net of income tax effects, and is not subsequently remeasured.

Financial guarantee contract liabilities

Financial guarantee contract liabilities are initially measured at their fair values and, if not designated as at FVTPL, are subsequently measured at the higher of:

- the amount of the obligation under the contract, as determined in accordance with Ind-AS 37 Provisions, Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets; and

- the amount initially recognised less, where appropriate, cumulative amortisation recognised in accordance with the revenue recognition policies.

Financial liabilities

Financial liabilities are classified as either financial liabilities ‘at FVTPL’ or ‘other financial liabilities’.

Financial liabilities at FVTPL

Financial liabilities are classified as at FVTPL when the financial liability is either held for trading or it is designated as at FVTPL.

A financial liability is classified as held for trading if:

- it has been acquired or incurred principally for the purpose of repurchasing it in the near term; or

- on initial recognition it is part of a portfolio of identified financial instruments that the Company manages together and for which there is evidence of a recent actual pattern of short-term profit-taking; or

- it is a derivative that is not designated and effective as a hedging instrument

A financial liability other than a financial liability held for trading may also be designated as at FVTPL upon initial recognition if:

- such designation eliminates or significantly reduces a measurement or recognition inconsistency that would otherwise arise; or

- the financial liability forms part of a Company of financial assets or financial liabilities or both, which is managed and its performance is evaluated on a fair value basis, in accordance with the Company’s documented risk management or investment strategy, and information about the Companying is provided internally on that basis; or

- it forms part of a contract containing one or more embedded derivatives, and Ind-AS 109 Financial Instruments permits the entire combined contract to be designated as at FVTPL.

Financial liabilities at FVTPL are stated at fair value, with any gains or losses arising on remeasurement recognised in the statement of profit and loss, except for the amount of change in the fair value of the financial liability that is attributable to changes in the credit risk of that liability which is recognised in other comprehensive income.

The net gain or loss recognised in the statement of profit and loss incorporates any interest paid on the financial liability.

Other financial liabilities

Other financial liabilities, including borrowings, are initially measured at fair value, net of transaction costs.

Other financial liabilities are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method, with interest expense recognised on an effective yield basis.

The effective interest method is a method of calculating the amortised cost of a financial liability and of allocating interest expense over the relevant period. The effective interest rate is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash payments through the expected life of the financial liability, or (where appropriate) a shorter period, to the net carrying amount on initial recognition.

Offsetting financial instruments

Financial assets and liabilities are offset and the net amount reported in the balance sheet when there is a legally enforceable right to offset the recognised amounts and there is an intention to settle on a net basis or realise the asset and settle the liability simultaneously. The legally enforceable right must not be contingent on future events and must be enforceable in the normal course of business and in the event of default, insolvency or bankruptcy of the Company or the counter party.

P. Derivatives and hedge accounting

Derivatives are initially recognised at fair value on the date a derivative contract is entered into and are subsequently re-measured at their fair value. The method of recognising the resulting gain or loss depends on whether the derivative is designated as a hedging instrument, and if so, the nature of the item being hedged.

The Company designates certain derivatives as either:

(a) hedges of the fair value of recognised assets or liabilities or a firm commitment (fair value hedge);

(b) hedges of a particular risk associated with a recognised asset or liability or a highly probable forecast transaction (cash flow hedge); or

(c) hedges of a net investment in a foreign operation (net investment hedge).

The Company documents at the inception of the transaction the relationship between hedging instruments and hedged items, as well as its risk management objectives and strategy for undertaking various hedging transactions. The Company also documents the nature of the risk being hedged and how the Company will assess whether the hedging relationship meets the hedge effectiveness requirements (including its analysis of the sources of hedge ineffectiveness and how it determines the hedge ratio).

The full fair value of a hedging derivative is classified as a non-current asset or liability when the residual maturity of the derivative is more than 12 months and as a current asset or liability when the residual maturity of the derivative is less than 12 months.

Fair value hedge

Changes in the fair value of derivatives that are designated and qualify as fair value hedges are recorded in the statement of profit and loss, together with any changes in the fair value of the hedged item that are attributable to the hedged risk.

Hedge accounting is discontinued when the Company revokes the hedging relationship, when the hedging instrument expires or is sold, terminated, or exercised, or when it no longer qualifies for hedge accounting. The fair value adjustment to the carrying amount of the hedged item arising from the hedged risk is amortised to the statement of profit and loss from that date.

Cash flow hedges

The effective portion of changes in the fair value of derivatives that are designated and qualify as cash flow hedges is recognised in other comprehensive income and accumulated under the heading cash flow hedging reserve. The gain or loss relating to the ineffective portion is recognised immediately in the statement of profit and loss, and is included in the ‘other gains and losses’ line item.

Amounts previously recognised in other comprehensive income and accumulated in equity are reclassified to the statement of profit and loss in the periods when the hedged item affects the statement of profit and loss, in the same line as the recognised hedged item. However, when the hedged forecast transaction results in the recognition of a non-financial asset or a non-financial liability, the gains and losses previously recognised in other comprehensive income and accumulated in equity are transferred from equity and included in the initial measurement of the cost of the non-financial asset or non-financial liability.

Hedge accounting is discontinued when the hedging instrument expires or is sold, terminated, or exercised, or when it no longer qualifies for hedge accounting. Any gain or loss recognised in other comprehensive income and accumulated in equity at that time remains in equity and is recognised when the forecast transaction is ultimately recognised in the statement of profit and loss. When a forecast transaction is no longer expected to occur, the gain or loss accumulated in equity is recognised immediately in the statement of profit and loss.

Hedges of net investments in foreign operations

Hedges of net investments in foreign operations are accounted for similarly to cash flow hedges. Any gain or loss on the hedging instrument relating to the effective portion of the hedge is recognised in other comprehensive income and accumulated under the heading of foreign currency translation reserve. The gain or loss relating to the ineffective portion is recognised immediately in the statement of profit and loss.

Gains and losses on the hedging instrument relating to the effective portion of the hedge accumulated in the foreign currency translation reserve are reclassified to the statement of profit and loss on the disposal of the foreign operation.

Q. Cash and cash equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents comprise cash at bank and in hand and short-term deposits with an original maturity of three months or less.

For the purposes of the Cash Flow Statement, cash and cash equivalents is as defined above, net of outstanding bank overdrafts. In the balance sheet, bank overdrafts are shown within borrowings in current liabilities.

R. Borrowing cost

Borrowing costs directly attributable to the acquisition, construction or production of qualifying assets are added to the cost of those assets, until such time as the assets are substantially ready for their intended use or sale. The Company considers a period of twelve months or more as a substantial period of time.

Transaction costs in respect of long-term borrowings are amortised over the tenor of respective loans using effective interest method. All other borrowing costs are expensed in the period in which they are incurred.

Investment income earned on the temporary investment of specific borrowings pending their expenditure on qualifying assets is deducted from the borrowing costs eligible for capitalization.

S. Accounting for government grants

Government grants are recognized when there is reasonable assurance that we will comply with the conditions attaching to them and that the grants will be received.

Government grants are recognised in the statement of profit and loss on a systematic basis over the periods in which the Company recognises as expenses the related costs for which the grants are intended to compensate. Government grants whose primary condition is that the Company should purchase, construct or otherwise acquire non-current assets are recognized in the balance sheet by setting up the grant as deferred income.

Other government grants (grants related to income) are recognized as income over the periods necessary to match them with the costs for which they are intended to compensate, on a systematic basis. Government grants that are receivable as compensation for expenses or losses already incurred or for the purpose of providing immediate financial support with no future related costs are recognized in the statement of profit and loss in the period in which they become receivable.

Grants related to income are presented under other income in the statement of profit and loss except for grants received in the form of rebate or exemption which are deducted in reporting the related expense. The benefit of a government loan at a below-market rate of interest is treated as a government grant, measured as the difference between proceeds received and the fair value of the loan based on prevailing market interest rates.

T. Employee Benefits

Retirement benefit and termination benefits

A defined contribution plan is a pension plan under which the Company pays fixed contributions into a separate entity. The Company has no legal or constructive obligations to pay further contributions if the fund does not hold sufficient assets to pay all employees the benefits relating to employee service in the current and prior periods. Payments to defined contribution retirement benefit plans are recognised as an expense when employees have rendered service entitling them to the contributions. For defined benefit retirement and medical plans, the cost of providing benefits is determined using the projected unit credit method, with actuarial valuations being carried out at the end of each annual reporting period. The present value of the defined benefit obligation is determined by discounting the estimated future cash outflows using interest rates of government bonds.

Remeasurement, comprising actuarial gains and losses, the effect of the changes to the asset ceiling (if applicable) and the return on plan assets (excluding interest), is reflected in the balance sheet with a charge or credit recognised in other comprehensive income in the period in which they occur. Remeasurement recognised in other comprehensive income is reflected immediately in retained earnings and will not be reclassified to the statement of profit and loss. Past service cost is recognised in the statement of profit and loss in the period of a plan amendment. Net interest is calculated by applying the discount rate at the beginning of the period to the net defined benefit liability or asset. Defined benefit costs are categorised as follows:

- service cost (including current service cost, past service cost, as well as gains and losses on curtailments and settlements);

- net interest expense or income; and

- remeasurement

The Company presents the first two components of defined benefit costs in the statement of profit and loss in the line item employee benefits expense. Curtailment gains and losses are accounted for as past service costs.

The retirement benefit obligation recognised in the balance sheet represents the actual deficit or surplus in the Company’s defined benefit plans. Any surplus resulting from this calculation is limited to the present value of any economic benefits available in the form of refunds from the plans or reductions in future contributions to the plans.

A liability for a termination benefit is recognised at the earlier of when the entity can no longer withdraw the offer of the termination benefit and when the entity recognises any related restructuring costs. In the case of an offer made to encourage voluntary redundancy, the termination benefits are measured based on the number of employees expected to accept the offer. Benefits falling due more than 12 months after the end of the reporting period are discounted to their present value.

Short-term and other long-term employee benefits

A liability is recognised for benefits accruing to employees in respect of wages and salaries, annual leave and sick leave in the period the related service is rendered at the undiscounted amount of the benefits expected to be paid in exchange for that service.

Liabilities recognised in respect of short-term employee benefits are measured at the undiscounted amount of the benefits expected to be paid in exchange for the related service.

Liabilities recognised in respect of other long-term employee benefits are measured at the present value of the estimated future cash outflows expected to be made by the Company in respect of services provided by employees up to the reporting date. The expected costs of these benefits are accrued over the period of employment using the same accounting methodology as used for defined benefit retirement plans. Actuarial gains and losses arising from experience adjustments and changes in actuarial assumptions are charged or credited to the statement of profit and loss in the period in which they arise. These obligations are valued annually by independent qualified actuaries.

U. Employee Share-based Payments

Equity-settled share-based payments to employees are measured at the fair value of the options at the grant date.

The fair value of option at the grant date is expensed over the vesting period with a corresponding increase in equity as “Employee Stock Options Account”. In case of forfeiture of unvested option, portion of amount already expensed is reversed. In a situation where the vested option forfeited or expires unexercised, the related balance standing to the credit of the “Employee Stock Options Account” are transferred to the “General Reserve”.

When the options are exercised, the Company issues new equity shares of the Company of Rs.1/each fully paid-up. The proceeds received and the related balance standing to credit of the Employee Stock Options Account, are credited to share capital (nominal value) and Securities Premium Account.

V. Income Taxes

Income tax expense represents the sum of the tax currently payable and deferred tax.

Current tax

The tax currently payable is based on taxable profit for the year. Taxable profit differs from ‘profit before tax’ as reported in the statement of profit and loss because of items of income or expense that are taxable or deductible in other years and items that are never taxable or deductible. The current income tax charge is calculated on the basis of the tax laws enacted or substantively enacted at the balance sheet date.

Management periodically evaluates positions taken in tax returns with respect to situations in which applicable tax regulation is subject to interpretation. It establishes provisions where appropriate on the basis of amounts expected to be paid to the tax authorities using a weighted average probability.

Deferred tax

Deferred tax is recognised on differences between the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities in the balance sheet and the corresponding tax bases used in the computation of taxable profit.

Deferred tax liabilities are generally recognised for all taxable temporary differences.

Deferred tax assets are generally recognised for all deductible temporary differences to the extent that it is probable that taxable profits will be available against which those deductible temporary differences can be utilised. Such assets and liabilities are not recognised if the temporary difference arises from initial recognition of goodwill or from the initial recognition (other than in a business combination) of other assets and liabilities in a transaction that affects neither the taxable profit nor the accounting profit.

The carrying amount of deferred tax assets is reviewed at each balance sheet date and reduced to the extent that it is no longer probable that sufficient taxable profits will be available to allow all or part of the asset to be recovered.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are measured at the tax rates that are expected to apply in the period in which the liability is settled or the asset realised, based on tax rates (and tax laws) that have been enacted or substantively enacted by the balance sheet date. The measurement of deferred tax liabilities and assets reflects the tax consequences that would follow from the manner in which the Company expects, at the reporting date, to recover or settle the carrying amount of its assets and liabilities.

Deferred tax assets and liabilities are offset when there is a legally enforceable right to set off current tax assets against current tax liabilities and when they relate to income taxes levied by the same taxation authority and the Company intends to settle its current tax assets and liabilities on a net basis.

Minimum Alternative Tax (MAT) is recognized as an asset only when and to the extent there is convincing evidence that the Company will pay normal income tax during the specified period. In the year in which the MAT credit becomes eligible to be recognized as an asset, the said asset is created by way of credit to the statement of profit and loss and included in deferred tax assets. The Company reviews the same at each balance sheet date and writes down the carrying amount of MAT entitlement to the extent there is no longer convincing evidence to the effect that the Company will pay normal income tax during the specified period.

Current and deferred tax are recognised in the statement of profit and loss, except when they relate to items that are recognised in other comprehensive income or directly in equity, in which case, the current and deferred tax are also recognised in other comprehensive income or directly in equity respectively. Where current tax or deferred tax arises from the initial accounting for a business combination, the tax effect is included in the accounting for the business combination.

W. Contingent Liabilities and Contingent Assets

A contingent liability is a possible obligation that arises from a past event, with the resolution of the contingency dependent on uncertain future events, or a present obligation where no outflow is probable. Major contingent liabilities are disclosed in the financial statements unless the possibility of an outflow of economic resources is remote. Contingent assets are not recognized in the financial statements.

X. Revenue recognition

The Company derives revenue principally from sale of speciality alumina, aluminium, aluminium value added products, copper, precious metals, di-ammonium phosphate and other materials. The Company recognises revenue from sale of goods when the goods are delivered and titles have been passed at which time all the following conditions are satisfied:

i) the Company has transferred to the buyer the significant risks and rewards of ownership of the goods;

ii) the Company retains neither continuing managerial involvement to the degree usually associated with ownership nor effective control over the goods sold;

iii) the amount of revenue can be measured reliably;

iv) it is probable that the economic benefits associated with the transaction will flow to the Company; and

v) the costs incurred or to be incurred in respect of the transaction can be measured reliably.

Revenue represents net value of goods and services provided to customers after deducting for certain incentives including, but not limited to discounts, volume rebates, incentive programs and contract signing bonus.

Shipping and handling amounts invoiced to customers are included in revenue and the related shipping and handling costs incurred are included in freight expenses when the Company is acting as principal in the shipping and handling arrangement.

Sales include excise duty and are net of Sales Tax and other applicable taxes.

For sales incentives to its customers, the Company makes estimates related to customer performance and sales volume to determine the total amounts earned and to be recorded as deductions from revenue. In making these estimates, the Company considers historical results that have a predictive value of the amount that the Company expects for the transferred goods and services. The actual amounts may differ from these estimates and are accounted for prospectively.

Certain of the Company’s sales contracts provide for provisional pricing based on the price on the London Metal Exchange Limited (LME) or London Bullion Markets Association (LBMA), as specified in the contract, when shipped. Final settlement of the prices is based on the applicable price for a specified future period. The Company’s provisionally priced sales are marked to market using the relevant forward prices for the future period specified in the contract with a corresponding adjustment to revenue.

Revenue from irrevocable bill and hold / holding certificate contracts is recognised when it is probable that delivery will be made, goods have been identified and kept separately, are ready for delivery in the present condition and usual payment terms for such contracts applies. Under these arrangements, revenue is recognised once legal title has passed and all significant risks and rewards of ownership of the asset sold are transferred to the customer.

Export incentives and subsidies are recognized when there is reasonable assurance that the Company will comply with the conditions and the incentive will be received.

Claim on insurance companies, railway authorities and others, where quantum of accrual cannot be ascertained with reasonable certainty, are accounted for on acceptance basis.

Y. Dividend and Interest Income

Dividend income from investments purchased is recognised when the shareholder’s right to receive payment has been established.

Interest income from a financial asset is recognised when it is probable that the economic benefits will flow to the Company and the amount of income can be measured reliably. Interest income is accrued on a time basis, by reference to the principal outstanding and at the effective interest rate applicable, which is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial asset to that asset’s net carrying amount on initial recognition.

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